Leadership, Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability, Part 7: Curative Marketing

Curative international marketing restores and develops international economic health and may be the next step up for marketing. “Restore” indicates something lost that once was there. “Developing” refers to new issues to be addressed with new tools and  frames  of  reference. “Health” in turn posi­tions the issue as important to overall welfare. Marketers must deliver joy, pleasure, fulfillment, safety, personal growth,  and  advancement towards a  better society.

Curative international marketing accepts responsibility for problems to which marketing has contributed. It then uses marketing’s capabilities to set things right, to heal past wounds, and to increase the well-being of the individ­ual and society on a global level. Curative marketing’s two perspectives consist of looking back to check on what marketing has wrought and making up for past errors with future action.

Global problems require a global approach. Curative international  market­ ing needs to draw on fields like jurisprudence, cultural anthropology, philoso­phy, and history. Such a perspective acknowledges that marketing is too important to be left to marketers alone, consonant with Keynes’s questioning “how and whether economics should rule the world.”

International marketers need to focus on  past  errors  and  mistakes  inflicted  by international marketing and sweep these out from under the carpet in the spirit of  Wiedergutmachung, or restitution.

Marketing’s disregard of local idiosyncrasies has sometimes been like the introduction  of  a destructive virus on a  culture,  akin to  bringing snakes to Guam which almost exterminated all the local birds and to how European outsiders brought smallpox, flu, and typhus viruses that decimated the Inca of Peru. More contemporaneous is a current lawsuit:

The Pine Ridge Indian tribe is suing five beer companies for their role in the alcohol­ ism and fetal alcohol syndrome that plague the tribe’s reservation. The Oglala Sioux Tribe claims that the beer companies—which include Anheuser Busch and Molson Coors一sold beer on the perimeter of the teetotalling South Dakota reservation with the knowledge that it would be smuggled in demanding $500 million for healthcare and rehabilitation. Whiteclay, a nearby town in Nebraska with four beer shops and only about a dozen residents, gets most of its customers from the reservation.

Tom White, the lawyer representing the tribe, told the Associated Press: “You cannot sell 4.9 million 12oz cans of beer and wash your hands like Pontius Pilate, and say we’ve got nothing to do with it being smuggled.” The reservation, which is about the size of Connecticut, has dealt with poverty and alcoholism for decades. One in four children born suffer from fetal alcohol syndrome, and the life expectancy, between 45 and 52 years, is the lowest in the U.S.

Eastern Europe, in its transition from socialism to  market  practices,  pro­ vides another example. Advertisements were taken literally, leading to grave dis­ appointments by consumers because they did not  win  the  “promised”  car  or  look like model Heidi Klum. Local foods (and their producers) disappeared  because newly entering chain stores already had suppliers. People were condi­tioned to increase their consumption of products, which led, for many, to con­sumption  addiction.

Growth is seen by many as the envisioned key accomplishment of market­ing. Executives planning only to maintain market share last only for a very short time in their job. More is expected. Citius, altius, fortius (“faster, higher, stronger”) may be a great motto for the Olympics, but it leads to unexpected repercussions for marketers and their customers.

Consumers’ interest in and preparation for marketing are not evenly dis­tributed. Negative effects may result from marketing’s misleading of consumers or simply from unawareness or neglect. It is the obligation of international marketers to understand local conditions   and to anticipate and limit possible ill effects. Not everything that can be done should be done. There must be a marketing Hippocratic Oath: “First do no  harm.”  Beyond  that caveat,  market­ers need to do everything  possible  to  make  people  be  better  off  and  actually feel better.

A second key concern is the future outlook: how can marketing set things right again? Four core areas are international marketing’s pillars for a shining position on the hill: truthfulness, simplicity, expanded participation, and per­sonal responsibility.

11 thoughts on “Leadership, Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability, Part 7: Curative Marketing

  1. Amazing blog! Is your theme custom made or did you download it
    from somewhere? A design like yours with a few simple tweeks would really make my
    blog jump out. Please let me know where you got your theme.
    Many thanks

  2. Write more, thats all I have to say. Literally, it seems as though you relied on the video to make your point. You obviously know what youre talking about, why waste your intelligence on just posting videos to your blog when you could be giving us something informative to read?

  3. Fantastic items from you, man. I’ve consider
    your stuff prior to and you’re simply extremely excellent.
    I actually like what you have bought right here, certainly like what you’re saying and the way wherein you say it.
    You’re making it enjoyable and you continue to take care of to keep it wise.

    I can’t wait to learn far more from you. That is actually a wonderful web site.

  4. My developer is trying to persuade me to move to .net from PHP. I have always disliked the idea because of the costs. But he’s tryiong none the less. I’ve been using WordPress on a variety of websites for about a year and am anxious about switching to another platform. I have heard fantastic things about blogengine.net. Is there a way I can transfer all my wordpress content into it? Any kind of help would be really appreciated!

Leave a Reply