The competitive advantage of nations

The focus of early trade theory was on the country or nation and its inherent, natural, or endowment characteristics that might give rise to increasing competitiveness. As trade theory evolved, it shifted its focus to the industry and product level, leaving the national-level competitiveness question somewhat behind. Recently, many have turned their attention to the question of how countries, governments, and even private industry can alter the condition within a country to aid the competitiveness of its firms.

The leader in this area of research has been Michael Porter of Harvard. As he states:

National prosperity is created not inherited. It does not grow out of a country’s natural endowments, its labor pool, its interest rates, or its currency’s values, as classical economics insists.

A nation’s competitiveness depends on the capacity of its industry to innovate and upgrade. Companies gain advantage against the world’s best competitors because of pressure and challenge. They benefit from having strong domestic rivals, aggressive home-based suppliers, and demanding local customers.

In a world of increasingly global competition, nations have become more, not less, important. As the basis of competition has shifted more and more to the creation and assimilation of knowledge, the role of the nation has grown. Competitive advantage is created and sustained through a highly localized process. Differences in national values, culture, economic structures, institutions, and histories all contribute to competitive success. There are striking differences in the patterns of competitiveness in every country; no nation can or will be competitive in every or even most industries.

Ultimately, nations succeed in particular industries because their home environment is most forward-looking, dynamic, and challenging.

Porter argued that innovation is what drives and sustains competitiveness. A firm must avail itself of all dimensions of competition, which he categorized into four major components of “the diamond of national advantage”:

  1. Factor conditions: The appropriateness of the nation’s factors of production to compete successfully in a specific industry. Porter notes that although these factor conditions are very important in the determination of trade, they are not the only source of competitiveness as suggested by the classical, or factor proportions, theories of trade. Most importantly for Porter, it is the ability of a nation to continually create, upgrade, and deploy its factors (such as skilled labor) that is important, not the initial endowment.
  2. Demand conditions: The degree of health and competition the firm must face in its original home market. Firms that can survive and flourish in highly competitive and demanding local markets are much more likely to gain the competitive edge. Porter notes that it is the character of the market, not its size, that is paramount in promoting the continual competitiveness of the firm. And Porter translates character as demanding customers.
  3. Related and supporting industries: The competitiveness of all related industries and suppliers to the firm. A firm that is operating within a mass of related firms and industries gains and maintains advantages through close working relationships, proximity to suppliers, and timeliness of product and information flows. The constant and close interaction is successful if it occurs not only in terms of physical proximity but also through the willingness of firms to work at it.
  4. Firm strategy, structure, and rivalry: The conditions in the home-nation that either hinder or aid in the firm’s creation and sustaining of international competitiveness. Porter notes that no one managerial, ownership, or operational strategy is universally appropriate. It depends on the fit and flexibility of what works for that industry in that country at that time.

These four points, as illustrated in Figure 3.5, constitute what nations and firms must strive to “create and sustain through a highly localized process” to ensure their success.

Porter’s emphasis on innovation as the source of competitiveness reflects an increased focus on the industry and product that we have seen in the past three decades. The acknowledgment that the nation is “more, not less, important” is to many eyes a welcome return to a positive role for government and even national-level private industry in encouraging international competitiveness. Including factor conditions as a cost component, demand conditions as a motivator of firm actions, and competitiveness all combine to include the elements of classical, factor proportions, product cycle, and imperfect competition theories in a pragmatic approach to the challenges that the global markets of the twenty-first century present to the firms of today.

9 thoughts on “The competitive advantage of nations

  1. Thanks for your personal marvelous posting! I definitely enjoyed
    reading it, you might be a great author.I will be sure to
    bookmark your blog and will come back later in life.
    I want to encourage that you continue your great work, have a nice holiday weekend!

  2. Needed to create you a little note to give many thanks over again just for the wonderful pointers you have provided here. It’s really strangely generous with you giving publicly precisely what most of us could have supplied for an electronic book to generate some bucks for themselves, primarily considering the fact that you could possibly have done it in case you considered necessary. The inspiring ideas also acted as the easy way to fully grasp that many people have the same keenness really like mine to know the truth significantly more with regards to this matter. I know there are some more enjoyable sessions ahead for individuals who read carefully your website.

  3. 10/9/2016 In my opinion, michaelczinkota.com does a excellent job of handling topics of this type! Even if frequently intentionally controversial, the information is generally well researched and thought-provoking.

  4. 10/5/2016 In my estimation, michaelczinkota.com does a good job of covering topics of this type. While sometimes intentionally controversial, the posts are more often than not well researched and stimulating.

  5. obviously like your web site however you have to take a look at the spelling on several of your posts. Several of them are rife with spelling issues and I to find it very bothersome to inform the reality nevertheless I will surely come again again.

Leave a Reply