About Michael Czinkota

Professor of International Marketing, Business and Trade at Georgetown University, Washington, DC, U.S. and University of Kent, Canterbury, UK - http://www.faculty.msb.edu/index.htm http://www.twitter.com/#!/michaelczinkota http://www.facebook.com/169628456631

Professor Michael Czinkota’s Blog is One of the 25 Most Influential Entrepreneur Websites of 2020

Every year, Sparpedia runs campaigns that honor the most outstanding blogs in its specialized field. This year, the platform carefully selected the websites that offer the most insightful discussions, coverages, and features that help businesses become better. I am honored to have my blog chosen by Sparpedia as one of the 25 most influential entrepreneur websites of 2020.


Sparpedia is a platform that makes it as easy for merchants as possible to get great savings, as they understand that those who do not have as much experience with e-commerce may find it difficult. 

You can find the full list of other entrepreneur websites here: https://sparpedia.dk/toplists/25-most-influential-entrepreneur-websites-of-2020/

COVID-19 Public Health Alert: Case Being Treated at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital

This is a message from Dr. Vince WinklerPrins, Georgetown University Chief Public Health Officer on March 9, 2020.

Dear Members of the Georgetown Community,

As you may know, DC Health has announced the District’s first presumptive positive case of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We have learned that our clinical partner, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital (MGUH), is caring for a patient who has been diagnosed through laboratory and clinical assessment for the COVID-19 virus. The care is being directed by a specialized team of clinicians trained to treat patients with a variety of communicable diseases.

DC Health is coordinating closely with MGUH, where the patient is currently being treated and all infection control protocols are fully implemented. This includes measures that ensure patient isolation, the use of protective equipment and the deployment of infection control and sterilization measures.

While no one in the Georgetown community has tested positive for COVID-19, MGUH is working closely with the CDC and DC Health and following all CDC protocols for patients and any staff and medical students who may have been impacted. Their health and safety is our top priority.  

Since January, Georgetown University has convened regular leadership meetings on this issue, activated an Emergency Response Team and has coordinated closely with DC Health, colleagues at MGUH and higher education partners. We have sent regular updates to the community, all of which are posted on an informational website along with other resources for our community.

We will continue to provide regular updates as we take additional measures to ensure the health and safety of our students, faculty, and staff. Earlier this week, all of our faculty members and academic staff were given resources on how to prepare for instructional continuity in the event we need to move to an online teaching environment.

We recognize this announcement may cause great concern and anxiety for members of our community. We encourage anyone who might need support to reach out to university resources, including the Office of Campus Ministry, Counseling and Psychiatric Services (CAPS) and Faculty and Staff Assistance Program (FSAP)

As we have shared previously, the CDC and DC Health recommend the best way to prevent the spread of COVID-19 is to:

  • Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds multiple times a day. An alcohol-based hand sanitizer can be used if soap and water are not available;
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands;
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick;
  • Stay home when feeling sick;
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash;
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.

We will continue to evaluate the situation on a daily basis and update you as needed. Please be aware that we are working in a rapidly changing environment, and we may need to amend our policies on short notice.

You can find all university updates, answers to frequently asked questions and other resources related to coronavirus on the Georgetown University website.

Sincerely,

Vince WinklerPrins, MD, FAAFP

Chief Public Health Officer

The Coronavirus: A New Risk of Trade

Over the past three generations, analyses of trade have indicated that speed of innovation and change is supportive of improved living standards. Growth of a country’s international trade has typically been more rapid than growth of the domestic economy. 

There is strong historic support for the benefit of speed. The Roman empire’simpact on thought and development can still be felt today. Its territories, also in the Middle East, were expanded less through armed conflicts, but rather through the speed and improvements offered to its international collaborators. The Pax Romana insured that merchants could travel safely on the roads that were built, maintained, and protected by Roman legions. The common coinage facilitated the speed of business transactions throughout the empire. Central market locations through the foundation of cities and excellent communication systems enabled the development and distribution of innovations. 

But conditions change. On February 2, the U.S. State Department placed China on a travel advisory of ‘Level 4: Do Not Travel’ due to the novel coronavirus (Covid-19) outbreak.  As of February 12, the death toll from the virus is at least 1,113. 

It matters how quickly something can be provided to a specific location. Also needed is control of the speed of distribution combined with the capability to plan for the “what if” question in case a disruption of shipment is required. 

We need to discover and systematically assess possible trouble spots of globalization and highlight the consequences of dependence. It is vital for the formulation of strategic visions to understand the need and capacity for disruption.

In the 1970s, Professor Bernard LaLonde of The Ohio State University expanded his analysis of inventory carrying cost to include the expense of capital tied up in the storage of goods. With interest rates of 17 percent and higher during the Carter presidency, his innovative assessment of expense and risk changed corporate inventory management substantially.  

The speed of Chinese viral contamination sends us a risk signal for trade. We discover that rapid propagation does not just work for incoming and outgoing goods and services. Just as there has been substantial growth in health care tourism, where patients obtain lower cost medical services by traveling abroad, the expansion of viral infection can be hard to contain. 

Rapid distribution outwards and inwards can be deteriorating and distracting. The coronavirus outbreak is our wakeup call to be alert, not just to the benefits but also the risks encountered in international outflows and inflows of services, ideas, thoughts, and goods.

This problematic raises the key issue of how to deal with such risky occurrences. One useful approach is the consultation with experts who have experienced sudden, frequent, and unexpected risk conditions. Such expertise can be sourced best from the Middle East where there have been many past occurrences of uncertainty, scrutiny, and restraint. Local experts may be able to help manage hostile business environments both at home and abroad. They can anticipate repercussions from disruptions and also calm down hyper reactions. And therein lies much of the wheel of fortune: if enough people believe in a condition, their understanding may well become reality. Let us not accept complex issues without expert insights.

Keywords: Coronavirus; Covid – 19; Risk; Global Trade; Outflow; Inflow; Bernard LaLonde; Distribution; State Department; International Trade

Conservative Faculty, Student Voices Feel Underrepresented at Georgetown University

The national trend for political party registrations and ideological leanings of college professors skews Democratic and liberal, according to data from the Higher Education Research Institute. This increases polarization of academic segmentation which can make nonpartisan discussions difficult. 

Last week, I was interviewed by The Hoya, the Georgetown University student newspaper, about my conservative viewpoint and how that affects the relationship with other faculties and my students. Please check out the article here: https://thehoya.com/conservative-feature/

Cause-Related Marketing in International Business: What Works and What Doesn’t?

Recently, I co-authored “Cause-Related Marketing in International Business: What Works and What Doesn’t?”with Prof. Demetris Vrontis, Prof. Alkis Thrassou, Dr. Michael Christofi, and Dr. S. M. Riad Shams. The paper is published in the International Marketing Review. 

We brought together empirical and theoretical advancements connecting the research gap of cause-related marketing (CRM) changes in the international context. We also focused on how extant and emergent variables and constructs can be leveraged in order to develop insights into what does and what does not work in international business in the context of CRM.