Our finalist team for the case study project designing a campaign for a non for profit

Congratulations to our amazing team for an amazing case competition and for all the hard work that you put in to make this project a success. Well done and congrats all teams for their splendid efforts.

Here is a picture of our semi-final winning team with Ambassador Kurt Jaeger. From left to right:

Claudia Crivello, Noor Darwish, Ambassador Kurt Jaeger, Georgia Weathers, William O’Brien, Nick O’Brien
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Pressure by Cuba will not pay off

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This past week, United States relations with Cuba were back in the spotlight. The Trump administration announced new restrictions on travel and trade with Cuba. The rollback of Obama’s measures towards the island’s government is a promise President Trump had made some months ago. The steps are reasonable, since  Obama’s agreement with Cuba was insufficient  and inequitable. The U.S. gave much and received little in return.

It has been more than a year since the normalization of relations. Clearly, Cuba has been unwilling to change rapidly, and past treaties were insufficiently in achieving a new robust track. One example is the continued discriminatory practices against Americans in the island. On a recently booked trip I had to Cuba, for example, it turned out that hotel rates were unjustifiably much higher for Americans than for Europeans, so I cancelled my plans.

The intention of the hotel was to give a silent retaliation for the years of economic embargo. The focus was on individuals that had no say on the matter and also no ability to change or improve American relations with Havana.

In fact, with the new tight restrictions, American individuals can no longer visit Cuba and groups need a license from the Treasury Department to visit the country. The Cuban tourism industry will feel the effects of U.S. government encouragement of Americans to stay in private houses and avoid hotels and restaurants connected to or owned by the military and security services.

After decades of adverse relationships, isn’t it time to bury the hatchet and bring out the peace pipe. For that, Cuba needs to take a step back and accept new policies which are fair, non-discriminatory and welcoming to visitors, both American and Cuban alike. As a fair trade and commerce relationship is not yet a reality, the United States government needed to demonstrate a stronger position in order to encourage appropriateness.

In addition, it is important to note that seeking improved relations with Havana does not mean forgetting the violations against human and civil rights during the Castro government. The population’s welfare is equally relevant as economic aspects in diplomatic relations, and actions such as expropriations and unjustified prison sentences should still be remembered and repaired. Curative marketing evaluates, carries physical accosting, debt, and destruction until true restitution is made.

Much remains to be done by Cuba, particularly since the United States has already long ago initiated important steps to reflect its own atonement. Cuban pressure to repay for earlier inequities will not work. Only if both parties commit to a fair relationship, will we see commerce between the countries grow and bring benefits and economic growth.

Georgetown First Year Seminar Guest Speaker

We were visited by Mr. Barry Rhoads, Chairman of Cassidy and Associates. He presented his insights on the role of private sector influence on government, establishing and disrupting relationships and the achievement of thought for legislation.

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Mr. Rhoads arrived in Washington as an officer in the U.S. Army, became a tax prosecutor for the U.S. Department of Justice. He is now the head of one of the largest lobbying firms in Washington D.C where he represents interests both foreign and domestic, such as Airbus Industries.

Georgetown First Year Seminar

I am delighted to have Ing. Jaroslava Pokorna Jermanová, who is the governor of the Central Bohemia Region of Czech Republic to our seminar. It’s such an honor to listen to her insights and the students all learned a lot from yesterday’s session.

WechatIMG143unnamed WechatIMG142Brief Work profile:

      • November 2016 elected by the governor of the Central Bohemia Region from October 2016 the representative of the Central Bohemia Region for the YO 2011 movement
      • 2014 until now the representative of Benešov and from 2016 the city councilor
      • November 2013 until now the deputy chairman of the Chamber of Deputies
      • October 2013 until now Member of the Parliament of the Czech Republic
      • 2007-2008 employee of ROP Central Bohemia
      • 2004-2008 representative of the Central Bohemian Region for ODS
      • 2002-2006 Mayor Krhanic in Benesov

Over the years, she has been employed by several private companies including a family enterprise to produce furniture, and before 2014 she was an advertising and marketing executive. She also founded the Women’s Academy, which aims to attract more women into politics.

Georgetown First Year Seminar Guest Speakers

I am delighted to have more key experts and guest speakers coming to my seminar.

Most recently we had

Katja Bullock
Special Assistant to the President for Presidential Personnel

 

Picture1Katja holds the same position and duties under Presidents Reagan, Bush 41 & 43 and now for President Trump. She is the Operations Officer in the Office of Presidential Personnel, responsible for all non-career appointments. Katja directs the Correspondence Unit, the Resume Management Group, as well as the clearance and nominating process of all presidential appointments in the Federal Government.

Professor Czinkota is very grateful for the visit of Katja, a key decision maker in White House
appointments. While high ranking politicians and public servants can get a few minutes with Mrs. Bullock, we had her for a full hour.

Frank Vogl

Co-founder Transparency Intl and the Partnership for Transparency Fund

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Frank Vogl is the co-founder of two leading international non-governmental organizations fighting corruption — Transparency International and the Partnership for Transparency.  He teaches a graduate course on “Corruption, Conflict and Security” at Georgetown University; writes frequently on U.S. and international corruption for The Globalist; and, lectures extensively.  Frank is also a specialist in international economics and finance with more than 45 years of experience in these fields.