The Hard Truths About Today’s Labor Market

Jerry Haar

Unemployed coal miners want their jobs back. So do manufacturing plant workers whose employment has been outsourced to lower-wage countries. Add to those young people, including scores of college graduates, whose job prospects are grim, forcing them into underemployment and requiring them to live at home rather than on their own.

This litany of complaints (and outrage) has fueled, in part, the resurgence of populism not only in the United States but in Europe, as well. And while these grievances are understandable, it is time for real truths–not alternative truths–about labor markets. These are:

Dying industries cannot be resuscitated. Typewriters, pay phones, folding maps, beepers, Kodak film, and cassette players are obsolete, their product life cycles have run their course and their replacements/substitutes superior in every way. Coalmining employed nearly 130,000 workers when Obama was elected president. By 2015 that figure had dropped to 98,000. Competition from cheap, shale gas; fracking; renewables; and technology was and will continue to be the reasons for the continual fall. Other declining industries include knitting and apparel, hardware manufacturing, communications, equipment, and glass manufacturing. Here, too, technology will boost productivity while decreasing labor input.

Most offshored jobs will not be re-shored. Although some will be coming back, the vast majority will not. Outsourcing, whether transferred in-company to an outside supplier, from a union state to a right- to-work state, or to a foreign country like China or Mexico is intended to reduce costs to allow a company to sell to consumers at a lower price. The negative impact on a firm’s employees will be the same. Reducing costs allow the company to offer consumers a lower price. When Delta moved 1,000 jobs to India it reduced costs by $25 million and used the money saved to fund 1,200 new reservations and sales positions in the U.S. The intent of market capitalism is to serve the consumer, not the producer’s employees.

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New World, New Policy: How Tax Cuts help U.S companies to go abroad

Professor Michael Czinkota

World trade has forged a network of global linkages, in which everyone and every country is involved. Nowadays, a drought in Brazil and its effect on coffee production and prices is felt around the world. U.S subsidies for ethanol production from corn affects prices for other agricultural crops and livestock in the far reaches of the world. As the key player in globalization, any U.S reform tends to change the international market. The old saying goes, if the U.S. sneezes, other nations catch a cold.

After only 100-days in office, President Trump has already released a tax reform memo to the public. Although not complete and detailed, there is clear a signal coming from the release how the government would like to encourage U.S companies to export and invest abroad.

First, comes a cut in the top tax rate for all businesses to 15%, far below the current 35% top rate. This reduction is not imbalanced since it would also benefit the owners and shareholders of international corporations in the United States. With this tax cut, companies, especially manufacturers, can lower the price of exports and have more money for R&D and marketing. This measure will greatly enhance the competitiveness of U.S goods in the global market. Also, a tax reduction will significantly reduce the financial constraint on companies and allow American companies to seek investment opportunities on a global scale.

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From Rome to Geneva: On the Significance of Trade

romeWhat gave Rome it’s preeminent power in the ancient world? No doubt its legionnaires were feared from Iberia to Galcantray. To fund military might the descendants of Romulus engaged in prolific international trade. Today, as globalization and international trade spark heated debates in capitals around the world, it is important to remember the long history of trade. From the Chinese to the Phoenicians, the Spaniards and the Dutch, the mighty British empire and the American industrial powerhouse, trade has been at the center of every great power in history. Great powers can either take that which they need by force, or buy it away. To most, trade is clearly preferable.

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Trade Tensions Felt in Florida

[Original Story from Jerry Haar of Miami Herald] – What are the costs of picking a fight with our neighbors to the north? The answer may surprise you.

The US recently announced it would levy anti-dumping penalties against Canada. These actions specifically target softwood timber, dairy, and steel. While the full effects are yet to be fully assessed, and opposition has been raised by an unexpected source: Florida.

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New world, New policy: Overcoming the Burden of Foreignness

burden of foreignnessWhy should we worry about misaligned participations in trade? According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, less than 1 percent of U.S. firms export. Tens of thousands of small-business manufacturers and service sector firms could export their goods and services, but do not. These companies often fear the challenges of going overseas. But all firms entering new markets face shortcomings and disadvantages when compared to local competitors. Due to a lack of local knowledge, unfamiliarity with market conditions, insufficient insights into consumer behavior, and newness to political decision making, all new entrants encounter a “burden of foreignness.” Policymakers need to help prospective exporters overcome this burden and successfully access new opportunities overseas.

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