Visit From Ms. Lawless and Ms. Laurence Battaille

It was a great pleasure to have Martha Lawless (left side), chief of the Services Industry Research Division at the U.S. International Trade Commission, return to my seminar.   Ms. Lawless focused on the latest global regulatory and policy measures in digital trade. She particularly highlighted the rapid emergence of digitally enabled services and manufacturing.

We had a surprise visit from Ms.Laurence Battaille, the Managing Partner of IPAC in Brussels. She shared her work in managing public relations for global firms and explained her firm’s growth in global consulting!

Today’s Spring Break

Today’s Spring Break

This spring, I wanted Michael Czinkota’s students to remember their “Marketing Across Borders” class while they traveled to azure beaches and Caribbean getaways. They were to connect their break experiences to some of the themes we have explored in class. Their responses offered an interesting – and illuminating – glimpse into how international marketing shapes the decisions of young travelers.

As digital natives, most of my students performed the research and planning for their trips online. Whether scoring cheaper flights or finding top restaurants, these young travelers turned to social media platforms and travel websites like AirBnb and TripAdvisor, to find affordable, and often all-inclusive, deals for hotels and flights. Students noted the power of word of mouth, which they far preferred over mass-market pamphlets, in guiding travel decisions. Much trust was placed in the reviews of peer travelers.

Much international travel was to Mexico, the Dominican Republic, and Germany.

But even when my students ventured outside their comfort zones, they still encountered elements of the familiar. They noted the prevalence of Japanese manufactured cars, such as Toyota, in countries like Mexico and Jamaica. For food, they found a preponderance of American brands – like McDonalds and Starbucks – that were almost identical to those in Cincinnati, Ohio.

A student, involved in a social justice immersion trip to Jamaica, found international marketing to be an important tool in business development. She found billboards with emotional global brand messages: “Kakoo loves Pepsi!”; “Jamaica, land we love; Honda, car we love.” Many messages were targeted toward tourists and rendered in English rather than local languages.

In terms of favorite topics, many of my students’ broached food. There was a fascination with the globalization of food products. Students were delighted to taste the delicious meals of the world. “Food trends from around the world had penetrated the Costa Rican market: Breakfast places were serving cold brewed ice coffee, kombucha, acai bowls, avocado toast, and homemade vegan bread. Australians own the best taco joint in Tamarindo. A woman from Minnesota was the chef at a local breakfast café. Markets served poke bowls (sushi bowls from Hawaii), arepas (shredded beef sandwiches from Venezuela), and traditional French pastries.”

Students saw a choice of goods that were produced in the U.S. but tasted differently abroad. In the Dominican Republic, there were different taste versions of Coca Cola. Snacks of choice, such as Doritos, were sold at two different prices depending on whether they were sold in American or Mexican packaging. In Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, the point of sale changed in supermarkets. Oreos were sold alongside American cereals rather than in the cookie section!

All these observations contribute to a wider understanding of international marketing forces that shape tourism for young travelers today. Travel can be good – it gives more perspective, more context and more variety. Surely, there will be more alternatives and new experiences, which make life more meaningful, spicy and more interesting.

Michael Czinkota teaches international business and trade at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business and the University of Kent. His key book (with Ilkka Ronkainen) is “International Marketing” (10th ed., CENGAGE).

Georgetown University students, Dina El-Saharty and Lisa Burgoa, contributed to this report.

Olympics VS Super Bowl. The Marketing Differences

Michael R. Czinkota  and Charles Skuba

The Super Bowl  reached viewers around the world, but Olympic advertisers will be communicating with a much broader audience from diverse cultures who will bring with them a different set of interests and emotions. To persuade such a multicultural audience, advertising will need to seek commonalities of the mind and heart.  Global advertising agencies have the expertise to create messages that work across borders and avoid the danger of leaving broad groups of viewers bewildered or, worse, offended.

We offer five winning techniques (not exclusive to each other)for creative messaging to global audiences during the Olympics in national and global media campaigns.  

 Universal human emotions come first. The best brands inspire and capture positive, if not joyful, emotion in their customers. Marketers know that emotion often trumps reason in purchase decisions. Dig deep into any customer psyche, whether of a business decision-maker or a teenage gamer, and you’ll find a bundle of emotions that are common to people across cultures.  Although there are cultural differences in what stirs emotion, some things are universal, like love stories and the pursuit of dreams.

For the 2012 London Olympic Games, P&G launched the global “Thank You Mom” campaign that celebrated the love of young Olympic athletes and their mothers. There may be no more powerful bond than the love between a mom and her child and that love is a universal emotion which is why P&G has renewed the theme for 2018.

Expansive imagery is also of major impact. The film industry has conditioned viewers across the world to crave dramatic, expansive imagery. The most successful global films create a powerful impact of sight and sound. The Olympics are a key opportunity for grand imagery. Marketers regularly use striking visuals to capture attention but the bar is being raised.

Inspiring sounds and music follow hand-in-hand with expansive imagery. Music enhances visuals for dramatic and emotional impact.  Marketers must be careful with music selection.  Coca Cola has long used “happiness” music to appeal to young people around the world. Naturally, if the music is great, people will want to share it.

Then there is symbolism. For simple communication of an idea, it’s hard to beat. Marketers often employ symbolism to enhance and distinguish their campaign and product messaging.

If you can show product advantage in advertising, your  marketing effort is working.  The trick is to get people’s attention to your message and also sell. Also, marketers would be smart to walk away from messaging that depends upon slang or references to national pop culture.  If you didn’t grow up watching American television, you might not understand a lot of pop culture references that U.S. audiences instantly absorb.

Super Bowl advertising is uniquely tuned to American audiences while that of the Olympics must be globally focused. Both will employ many of the techniques identified here.  Marketers are literally going for the global gold. For the audience, the Olympic marketing messages will be quite different from the ones of the Super Bowl but well worth waiting for.

 

Prof. Michael Czinkota researches international marketing and business issues at Georgetown University in Washington D.C. He served in trade policy positions in the George H.W. Bush and Ronald Reagan administrations. His International Marketing text is now in its 10th edition. czinkotm@georgetown.edu

 Charles Skuba teaches international business and marketing at Georgetown University. He served in the George W. Bush administration in trade policy positions in the U.S. Department of Commerce and previously was a senior executive in advertising. cjs29@georgetown.edu

Georgetown First Year Seminar – Final Presentation

With help of a course specific editorial board, each student in FYS write a draft editorial during the semester, and made it a final public editorial and delivered a 4-minute presentation on the November 29th session of the course. During the session, students showed their innovation and great presentation skills. The editorial board members gave their insightful opinions and suggestions on the topics. Professor Czinkota also prepared a sweet Certificate of Appreciation to all the editorial board members for their generous contribution to the course.

unnamed2Students in FYS develop an editorial which tackles an institutional trade issue relevant to them. These editorials can take any form of dissemination ranging from print instruments, social media, or Youtube films. The work can include an assessment of government and taxpayer expenditure on a trade related measures. Or it can represent the impact of government actions on corporate trade conditions. The first editorial draft is handed in for comment by and discussion with the instructor and the editorial team on Oct. 11. Subsequently, after discussion, the goal is to produce one cohesive, brief and insightful commentary which is postable or publishable for mail-out. Each student collaborated with the editorial board, the coaches and professor.

Editorial Board Members: Thank you very much for taking time sharing your unique insights and experience to the students. Your advice has greatly inspired them to take a deeper view in the subject matter and beyond. Your kind talk would always be remembered by the students.

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Thank you again for the 5 amazing editorialists: (from left to right)

Molly Fleenor
Assistant Director of Communications
Georgetown University McDonough School of Business

Joana Godinho
Guest Producer
CGTN/CCTV News

Nicolette Hurd
Consultant
The McCormick Group

Jennifer Boettcher
Business Information Consultant
Georgetown University

Glenn Morel
CEO & Founder
AVID Productions

 

Our finalist team for the case study project designing a campaign for a non for profit

Congratulations to our amazing team for an amazing case competition and for all the hard work that you put in to make this project a success. Well done and congrats all teams for their splendid efforts.

Here is a picture of our semi-final winning team with Ambassador Kurt Jaeger. From left to right:

Claudia Crivello, Noor Darwish, Ambassador Kurt Jaeger, Georgia Weathers, William O’Brien, Nick O’Brien
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