Georgetown First Year Seminar

I am delighted to have Ing. Jaroslava Pokorna Jermanová, who is the governor of the Central Bohemia Region of Czech Republic to our seminar. It’s such an honor to listen to her insights and the students all learned a lot from yesterday’s session.

WechatIMG143unnamed WechatIMG142Brief Work profile:

      • November 2016 elected by the governor of the Central Bohemia Region from October 2016 the representative of the Central Bohemia Region for the YO 2011 movement
      • 2014 until now the representative of Benešov and from 2016 the city councilor
      • November 2013 until now the deputy chairman of the Chamber of Deputies
      • October 2013 until now Member of the Parliament of the Czech Republic
      • 2007-2008 employee of ROP Central Bohemia
      • 2004-2008 representative of the Central Bohemian Region for ODS
      • 2002-2006 Mayor Krhanic in Benesov

Over the years, she has been employed by several private companies including a family enterprise to produce furniture, and before 2014 she was an advertising and marketing executive. She also founded the Women’s Academy, which aims to attract more women into politics.

Georgetown First Year Seminar Guest Speakers

I am delighted to have more key experts and guest speakers coming to my seminar.

Most recently we had

Katja Bullock
Special Assistant to the President for Presidential Personnel

 

Picture1Katja holds the same position and duties under Presidents Reagan, Bush 41 & 43 and now for President Trump. She is the Operations Officer in the Office of Presidential Personnel, responsible for all non-career appointments. Katja directs the Correspondence Unit, the Resume Management Group, as well as the clearance and nominating process of all presidential appointments in the Federal Government.

Professor Czinkota is very grateful for the visit of Katja, a key decision maker in White House
appointments. While high ranking politicians and public servants can get a few minutes with Mrs. Bullock, we had her for a full hour.

Frank Vogl

Co-founder Transparency Intl and the Partnership for Transparency Fund

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Frank Vogl is the co-founder of two leading international non-governmental organizations fighting corruption — Transparency International and the Partnership for Transparency.  He teaches a graduate course on “Corruption, Conflict and Security” at Georgetown University; writes frequently on U.S. and international corruption for The Globalist; and, lectures extensively.  Frank is also a specialist in international economics and finance with more than 45 years of experience in these fields.

The US and Europe demonstrating unity on energy security

Bart Marcois

ukraine_flagCalmly in July, a party leader from the Czech Republic visited Washington to hold discussions with the White House and Republican members in Congress on the basis of shared values, including peace in Europe. At the recommendation of senior national security officials, he has reached out to his neighboring countries, to the east and the west. His aim: to link Europe and the U.S. in a pragmatic formula to secure energy independence in Ukraine and provide economic opportunities for the Czech Republic.

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Gaining a Competitive Edge—Companies Turn to Cloud Computing

Internal-devaluationAs we enter the second quarter of 2017, the global economy is experiencing its sixth year of stagnation, and the growth outlook does not indicate any improvement. Consumers and businesses share a sense of anxiety, uncertainty and reticence regarding both the economic and political environment across the globe.

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A Philanthropic Awakening in Latin America

A Philanthropic Awakening in Latin America

Jerry Haar

For a long time standing now, “Latin American philanthropy” has been considered an oxymoron. Traditionally, wealthy Latins and corporations have had deep pockets but short hands, believing it the role of the public sector to fund charitable and philanthropic endeavors while keeping their own wealth in the family, shipping it offshore or giving it to the Church.

 

The times they-are-a- changing, however; for without much fanfare we are witnessing a growing awareness among the wealthy and corporations–principally through corporate foundations in the region–that philanthropic giving and social engagement are critically important and highly beneficial for their nations, to society, their companies and themselves. (It should be noted that most countries in Latin America use the term “private social investment” rather than philanthropy.)

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