Commonality Builds A Bridge

International business complexity calls for commonality. The need for and acceptance of the soul builds up a common path and provides a joint perspective underpinned by a broadly supported objective.

Rising global communication and output from a global labor force have created a growing and diverse marketplace. Changes include the contrast and juncture of controversial debates over international trade, artificial intelligence, refugees, terrorism, and greatly intensify the complexity of international business. 

Commonality is increasingly difficult, yet important to achieve for the sake of relationship and trust building in international business. The understanding of the soul and its accompanying emotional subcomponents provides  individuals, companies, and countries with the opportunity to develop and align global values and bridges between them. If people act and argue focused on business principles alone, they may find themselves increasingly ignored.

New thinking and behavior regarding collaboration are needed to help employees work across cultures. According to the World Bank, the global labor force has reached almost 3.5 billion in 2018. A shortage of skilled workers may intensify competition for talent. 

Due to a lack of local knowledge, unfamiliarity with market conditions, insufficient insights into consumer behavior, and newness to political decision making, foreign firms typically face shortcomings and disadvantages when entering a new market. The overarching umbrella is provided by the soul, which affects judgment and, offers simplicity. It allows the understanding of truth and enables good decision-making in light of changing realities. For example, negotiators who lose tend to blame their loss on the corruption and nepotism of winners. Yet, culturally, the closeness to family and desire to help one’s own environment can be seen as a supportive obligation rather than a deviation. How good it is to lay off blame and recognize the conditionality of behavior and management.

The soul and its key pillars such as politics, security, and religion can teach new entrants more and prepare them better than mere principles of economics and business.

Some lessons can be taken from history which permeates our lives but is usually forgotten. We bemoan the disruptions from terrorism but neglect that the Crusaders already wrote home about their fear of terror. We debate new approaches of artificial intelligence in teaching and communication but don’t recall the effects which Gutenberg’s printing press of 1440, wireless telegraphy, or the introduction of radio had on business and society. We deplore the differentiation of groups based on religion but conveniently forget the impact of Torquemada, the Inquisition, or the reactions to Luther’s theses on the church doors of Wittenberg. 

Retrospection of the far-reaching consequences of past international conflicts and reconciliations may bring some new insights to the solution of complexity. Not all measures are equal at all times. Tariffs, for example, can be a tool to deal with crises and promote trade. 

International marketing offers a new linkage in cultures and values. New progress in thinking and behavior can and must shape a greater global commonality in values.

Professor Czinkota (czinkotm@georgetown.edu) teaches international marketing and trade at Georgetown University and the University of Kent in Canterbury. 

JIBS Silver Medal

Dear Colleagues
I am pleased to have been selected for the 50 Year JIBS Silver Award. Here is the letter of notification.

As Managing Editor of JIBS, it is my great pleasure to inform you that the AIB Executive Board has awarded you the JIBS Silver Medal, as a formal recognition of your intellectual contributions published in the journal.  More specifically, the Silver Medal has been awarded to a small number of IB scholars who have published at least 5 significant papers in JIBS during the first 50 years of its existence (we excluded book reviews, as well as other more minor contributions such as letters or short syntheses of papers in introductions to special issues).

The Silver Medals will be given to the Awardees at the AIB Conference in Copenhagen in June 2019.  

Please do let me know at your earliest convenience whether you can attend the JIBS celebration event on Tuesday, June 25, and please do include Dr. Ayesha Malhotra (ayesha.malhotra@haskayne.ucalgary.ca), our associate for this special occasion, in your response.  All the details of the event are provided in the attachment to this email.

I look forward to seeing you all in Copenhagen!

With best wishes,

Anne

Anne Hoekman

Managing Editor

Journal of International Business Studies

www.jibs.net

A SUMMER IN CANTERBURY

Scholars typically spend their summers at interesting and learn-worthy organizations. For my summer this year such destination will be the University of Kent in Canterbury, UK. There I will participate in several events. I will be help coordinate a university-wide international business seminar: Global Business in a Dynamic Environment.

The Global Business in a Dynamic Environment course (details found here) provides a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of international business and the institutions involved in the process. Although there is an underlying universality to the basic principles of business administration, it is in the application of these principles that people in international business encounter unique problems. Theory will be emphasized for a normative understanding; practical aspects are designed to show the relation of theory to practice. We will teach each other and learn from each other by the use of analogies, parables, and examples – which will help us understand and remember, which, in an era of the British Exit from the European Union has taken on major significance.

I encourage interested students and scholars to attend those events. It will allow to make lasting connections with students from around the world, studying a range of subjects but sharing personal enthusiasm. Guided by leading professors from around the world such as a large team from the University of Kent, German, and the United States, Mark Casson England, Johannes Harl, Germany, Thomas Cooke, Michael Czinkota, Gary Knight and Charles Skuba of the United States, will enable participants to gain a deeper understanding of other cultures, develop new network, make lifelong friends from a wide variety of backgrounds and benefit from globally-renowned academic excellence. Stay tuned for more information!

The teaching team members are

Prof. Martin Meyer, Kent
Prof. Michael Czinkota , Kent and Georgetown
Prof.Gary Knight, Williamette
Prof. Zaheer Khan, Kent
Prof. Rudiger Kaufmann, Mannheim
Prof. Valbona Zeneli, Marshall Center
Mr. Adam Smith, Kent

The Course schedule

So that’s my summer. How about yours? If you want to join me and a group of distinguished colleagues please contact Floortje Hoette at f.hoette@kent.ac.uk to sign up for the course/seminar or request more detailed information about the summer events.

Wake Up the Smartest

In this newest video, Professor.Czinkota speaks about how the book was written in short chapters with witty illustrations enabling the reader to digest a little information at a time and wake up the smartest person in the room.