A World without international marketing?

A World without international marketing?

-Michael R. Czinkota

 Sometimes we only know what we lost when it has left us. I put this thought to the test it in my class of Georgetown University students. In our course “Marketing Across Borders”, we worked on the question: “What would life look like without international marketing?”. The answers offered various perspectives reflecting their interest and training in international affairs. The range was broad, addressing the impact of international marketing in the context of diversity, choices, cultural exchange, and international quality standards.

            On a personal level, students saw substantial impact of international marketing on their lives. Some mentioned that international marketing and its activities creates thousands of jobs around the world.This was seen as highly relevant to themselves, but they included their parents as well since such a change clearly involved today and the future. Some students said that without International Marketing a life would be simpler but not necessarily in a good way. International Marketing was seen to bring to life a variety of products that enrich consumers and make them more productive.

Some respondents highlighted the exposure to new thoughts and ideas that International Marketing brings to people around the world. Such exposure motivates the competition between companies to supply better quality combined with better value. This competition leads to innovation in products across different markets around the world. Without International Marketing, the high quality standards we have today would diminish due to decreasing competition.

            Companies would also feel  the absence of International Marketing. Expansion across borders will be harder and would have to rely without marketing heavily on word of mouth communication. Exports and imports will be far less than today’s value since international activities will be less profitable. Selling products to other cultures in which they are not interested will be difficult. Companies will have fewer opportunities to learn and develop from others as well. Problems will be caused by a lack of willingness to adjust or a lack of motivation to develop and compete. In consequence, the world won’t be as efficient as today.

            There was the hypothesis that International Marketing is likely to reduce poverty and increase international cooperation. These benefits would disappear when foreign direct investment decreases. Sales in foreign markets would diminish without the lubricating effect of international marketing. Less cultural awareness of others would be the consequence of a decline in intercultural communication. Companies would be less socially responsible and transparent as they won’t be inspired by other international companies who serve international communities. This would newly insert more psychic distance between cultures and countries, and reduce the attention paid to common problems and actions taken for the public good.

            Finally, we explored what students would miss most, where does the pain threshold begin: We know about the wide variety of products that are moved and brought to market thanks to marketing. So how about the loss of video games, cars, music tourism or even commercials. These items were touched on, but the core of items one would miss the most were Food, Food, and Food again.  Students were quite varied in their thinking as long as the items whose loss was deplored dealt with sustenance or alimentation. Leading among products held dear were chocolate, snacks, noodles, candies and anything else which could be eaten by chopstick. Quite a broad base from students whose parents were only introduced to new eating utensils. Food and its variety tend to give staying power to globalization and also encourage cross fertilization. Let it give new opportunity to a life with spice.

Michael Czinkota teaches international business and trade at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business and the University of Kent. His key book (with Ilkka Ronkainen) is “International Marketing” (10th ed., CENGAGE).

Spring 2018: Marketing Across Borders Syllabus


For the Spring 2018 semester, Prof. Michael Czinkota of the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University, offers a course on “Marketing Across Borders”.

The course will cover the internationalization and intersection of business and marketing. We will understand the global environment drivers and directions for business, and how policy frameworks are shaped around them, being affected by key variables such as culture and behavior. We will introduce living cases to offer examples of the topics we cover.

Storytelling and interaction will be dynamics of the course, with an emphasis on small and medium sized firms. We will also use learning exercises such as video productions and elevator pitches.

Below you can  find a more detailed syllabus of the course. In the following link you can see a video of Prof. Czinkota welcoming you to the course: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OebH1ikkF3o

If you are a Georgetown University student, hurry up and sign up to the course and join us.

Slide1 Slide2 Slide3 Slide4 Slide5 Slide6 Slide7 Slide8

Michael Czinkota teaches international business and trade at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business and the University of Kent. His key (with Ilkka Ronkainen) book is “International Marketing” (10th ed., CENGAGE).

Welcome to Marketing Across Borders

Prof. Czinkota welcomes the students of his Spring 2018 course in McDonough School Of Business of Georgetown University, “Marketing Across Borders”

Breakfast of Champions



On Monday (11th December, 2017) morning we hosted a get together for selected post graduate students.  These were drawn from course reps but also selected by Program Directors who identified individuals whose contribution to the programs was really making a difference.   Students were asked to offer brief feedback on…

– I feel good, because….

– I’d love to do more of….

– my best class experience was…

– on Campus, I enjoy most…

– millennials need classes to focus on ….

– …. will help me most with a job

Things students said in their two minute talk included:

  • I feel good being part of an academic community.
  • Each day, I improve.
  • Kent offers an entrepreneurial course, designed around asking professionals in the finance industry. As such, not only do I get academic skills but I’m gaining professional skills too.
  • I value the Bloomberg Room.
  • Professors are all very helpful and I’m learning relevant skills
  • Being on the program gives me different cultural perspectives.
  • I have found seminars really help me in developing my skills – it’s great to talk with so many different nationalities.

Thanks to Michael for his idea, for organizing the medals and for being thoroughly affable. Thanks to Tamsin for helping with arrangements.  Thanks also to Martin, Radu, Jaideep, Shaomin, Omar, Irena and Maddy for coming along.