Professor Czinkota presents in Copenhagen

Professor Michael Czinkota recently presented research and findings in Copenhagen, on correlation between Migrants and Entrepreneurship. Here is part 1/3 from his presentation.

Enjoy the insights! Please feel free to share, comment and exchange thoughts.

History does not always tell the Future

Historically. increased international trade activities are often linked to the growth of a country. National power in the world was often the result of creating new markets and trade. For example, the Roman Empire achieved immense growth through the linkages of business rather than the marching of legions and warfare. Many economic successes also occurred when previously closed economies embraced international trade like South Korea in 1960s and China in 1980s.

So far, in this century, more than a billion people around the world have been lifted out of poverty by the power of international trade. International competition has greatly stimulated innovation and productivity. 

However, world trade is in flux today. Conflicts have emerged over market instabilities and insecure trade structures which have led to major inequities.  No longer are societies certain that an increase in trade resolves current economic and societal shortcomings. Will a better life result from simply doing more of what was done in the past?  

Globally some policymakers intend to ride inequities to the hilt. They  give preference to the continuity of rules over the adjustment to reality. For them tradition is the overriding decision tool. 

But, what happens when the fundament has changed? When a volcano erupts and sends a stream of glowing lava flowing down the mountain,  the affected villages are no longer fit for shelter. Today, President Trump reflects the need for new actions in a new era. He is positively  willing to disregard the past when its performance distorts the playing field. The consequences have been important. 

In 2017, the U.S. started to renegotiate its trade agreements with Canada,  Mexico, and with South Korea. It questions the World Trade Organization (WTO) and  challenges the whole trade administration system. In addition, a series of import tariffs came into effect. All these steps indicate a better understanding of shortcomings in trade and a quick-footed willingness to precipitate a curative impact. President Reagan already indicated that “all politics are local”. That principle is expanded into a new approach which states “timing matters for change”.

Continuing large trade imbalances and growing foreign investment control are sources of dissatisfaction. Domestic producers fear to be

squeezed  by global rivals. New production technology, such as product printing, makes manufacturing history obsolete. Processes also matter. China has taken full advantage of the trade infrastructure built by the U.S. and the EU only to subsequently challenge the status quo. The United States’ share of world exports has declined precipitously from 25 percent in the 1950s to less than 9 percent in 2017. The U.S. share of world imports now accounts for 13 percent of world imports. When compared to its exports, the United States clearly has an excess import consumption.  

Reshaping a global system is tough work. Since 1945, the United States has been at the center of the global economy. In its competition with the socialist system market orientation has clearly been won by America. Encouraging now other nations to also help guide the world to better lives does not represent an abdication of leadership. The United States’ willingness to let others participate  in the design and implementation of crucial adjustments demonstrates a willingness to permit others to learn, an encouragement of  self determination, and a great spirit of security and comfort with  change 

The debates over international trade might rumble on for years. But we already know that trade policy must become more domestically oriented while domestic policy must become more international in vision. Doing so, must shape the future.

Professor Czinkota (czinkotm@georgetown.edu) teaches international marketing and trade at Georgetown University and the University of Kent in Canterbury. His latest book is ‘In Search for the Soul of International Business’ 2019, Businessexpertpress.com 

Cambridge/Kent/Czinkota Competition for excellence in International Business Case writing

INVITATION TO PARTICIPATE

Cambridge/Kent/Czinkota Competition

for excellence in International Business Case writing

Applying:

Case submitted by faculty and students, can cover the entire spectrum of the International Business sphere, covering, for example, but not limited to, Trade and Investment Policies, the International Business Environment or Strategy and Operations. The deadline for submission of the previously unpublished final case, including instructor’s solution materials, is April 15, 2019.

Length of submission: Less than 3,000 words (the solution material does not count against this limit)

Please submit to Prof. Michael Czinkota M.Czinkota@Kent.ac.uk

Cases will be evaluated and selected by an international Jury whose decisions are final.

Prizes:

Winners receive a Certificate and will be entered in the Kent Business School Book of Honor

Prizes are:

🏆 First Prize: £ 500

Second Prize: £ 250

Third Prize: £ 125

Prizes 4-12: £ 50

Winning cases are also eligible for publication in the forthcoming Cambridge Press book by Prof. Michael Czinkota, Prof. Ilkka Ronkainen and Prof. Suraksha Gupta

If you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please contact M.Czinkota@Kent.ac.uk

A SUMMER IN CANTERBURY

Scholars typically spend their summers at interesting and learn-worthy organizations. For my summer this year such destination will be the University of Kent in Canterbury, UK. There I will participate in several events. I will be help coordinate a university-wide international business seminar: Global Business in a Dynamic Environment.

The Global Business in a Dynamic Environment course (details found here) provides a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of international business and the institutions involved in the process. Although there is an underlying universality to the basic principles of business administration, it is in the application of these principles that people in international business encounter unique problems. Theory will be emphasized for a normative understanding; practical aspects are designed to show the relation of theory to practice. We will teach each other and learn from each other by the use of analogies, parables, and examples – which will help us understand and remember, which, in an era of the British Exit from the European Union has taken on major significance.

I encourage interested students and scholars to attend those events. It will allow to make lasting connections with students from around the world, studying a range of subjects but sharing personal enthusiasm. Guided by leading professors from around the world such as a large team from the University of Kent, German, and the United States, Mark Casson England, Johannes Harl, Germany, Thomas Cooke, Michael Czinkota, Gary Knight and Charles Skuba of the United States, will enable participants to gain a deeper understanding of other cultures, develop new network, make lifelong friends from a wide variety of backgrounds and benefit from globally-renowned academic excellence. Stay tuned for more information!

The teaching team members are

Prof. Martin Meyer, Kent
Prof. Michael Czinkota , Kent and Georgetown
Prof.Gary Knight, Williamette
Prof. Zaheer Khan, Kent
Prof. Rudiger Kaufmann, Mannheim
Prof. Valbona Zeneli, Marshall Center
Mr. Adam Smith, Kent

The Course schedule

So that’s my summer. How about yours? If you want to join me and a group of distinguished colleagues please contact Floortje Hoette at f.hoette@kent.ac.uk to sign up for the course/seminar or request more detailed information about the summer events.

International Business Seminar at the University of Kent in Canterbury, Sign Up Now.

Summer School, sign up now

https://evision.kent.ac.uk/urd/sits.urd/run/siw_ipp_lgn.login?process=siw_ipp_app&code1=ASUM0001C2CR-FD&code2=0004

The Kent Business Summer School is part of the University of Kent Summer School programme. It will allow you to make lasting connections with students from around the world, studying a range of subjects but sharing your own enthusiasm. International study will enable you to gain a deeper understanding of another culture, make lifelong friends from a wide variety of backgrounds and benefit from globally-renowned academic excellence.

Find out what our students think of the Summer Schools on our Summer School Blog.

For additional reasons to join us, visit our Canterbury Summer Schools overview.