Achieving ‘Glocal’ Success

Michael R. Czinkota and Ilkka A. Ronkainen for www.ama.org

Companies that have adopted this approach have incorporated the following four dimensions into their organizations.

Building a Shared Vision

The first dimension relates to a clear and consistent long-term corporate mission that guides individuals wherever they work in the organization. Examples of this are Johnson & Johnson’s corporate credo of customer focus; Coca-Cola’s mission of leveraging global beverage brand leadership “to refresh the world, inspire moments of optimism and happiness, create value and make a difference”; Nestlé’s vision to make the company the “reference for nutrition, health and wellness”; and Samsung’s mission to “create superior products and services, thereby contributing to a better global society.” But formulating and communicating a vision or mission cannot succeed unless individual employees understand and accept the company’s stated goals and objectives.

Broadening Perspectives

This relates to the development of a cooperative mindset among region or country organizations to ensure the effective implementation of global strategies. Managers may believe that global strategies are intrusions on their operations if they do not have an understanding of the corporate vision, if they have not contributed to the global corporate agenda, if they are not given direct responsibility for its implementation or if there is no reward for their cooperation.

Capable Managers

The third component in the “glocal” approach is making use of representatives from different countries, regions, and cultures. Organizationally, the forces of globalization are changing the country manager’s role significantly. With profit-and-loss responsibility, oversight of multiple functions, and the benefits (and drawbacks) of distance from headquarters, country managers enjoyed considerable decision-making autonomy, as well as entrepreneurial initiative. Today, however, many companies have to emphasize the product dimension of the product-geography matrix, which means that power has to shift at least to some extent from country managers to worldwide strategic business unit and product line managers. Many of the previously local decisions are now subordinated to global strategic moves.

Internal Cooperation

In today’s environment, the global business entity can be successful only if it is able to move intellectual capital within the organization—that is, to transmit ideas and information in real time. If there are impediments to the free flow of information across organizational boundaries, important updates about changes in the competitive environment might not be communicated in a timely fashion to those tasked with incorporating them into the strategy.

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The Honorable Merchant in International Marketing Sessions 3-4

——Friday, April 18—— 

All sessions will be held in the Ballroom – Cielo 

9:00 – 10:00 Session 3: Meet the Editors 

Moderator: Rüdiger Kaufmann (University of Nicosia)

Mary Teagarten, Editor in Chief (Thunderbird International Business Review)

David Stewart, Editor (Journal of Public Policy and Marketing)

David Griffith, Former Editor (Journal of International Marketing)

10:00 – 10:15 Break 6

10:15 – 11:45 Session 4: The Honorable Merchant and International Action 

Moderator: Suraksha Gupta (Brunel University)

Relationship factor as the key to Sustainable Export Marketing with Asia 

Anura Amarasena (Swinburne University) and Geoffrey Chow (Swinburne University)

Online Retailing Paired with Kirana – A Formidable Combination for emerging Markets 

Piyush Kumar Sinha (IIM Ahmedabad) and Srikant Gokhale (IIM Ahmedabad)

Investigating Quality Perceptions of Foreign Services by Chinese Consumers 

Subir Bandyopadhyay (Indiana University)

The International Dive of Inter-Generational New Products: Measures, Patterns, and Predictive Model 

Javier Palacios Fenech (Universidad Adolfo Ibañez) and Gerard Tellis (Universidad Adolfo Ibañez)

The evolution of scholarly research on international marketing managers’ behavior of exporters and marketing relationships: A critical discussion on the ethical profile and competences of international marketing managers 

George S. Spais (Graduate Technological Educational Institute of Western Greece) and Rüdiger Kaufmann (University of Nicosia)

11:45 – 13:15 Lunch Break (at leisure throughout the resort) 

13:15 – 13:45 Keynote: Keeping Trust on the Policy Side 

Major General (ret.) Al Zapanta (President & CEO, U.S. – Mexico Chamber of Commerce)

This year’s conference theme: The Honorable Merchant and International Marketing

ANNOUNCING THE ANNUAL MEETING ON INTERNATIONAL MARKETING

The American Marketing Association 2014 Global Marketing SIG Conference

  “The Honorable Merchant in International Marketing”

 April 16-18, 2013         Cancun, Mexico

To register for the event click here.

All conference information is available at: http://michaelczinkota.com/ama-global-marketing-sig/american-marketing-association-2014-conference-cancun-mexico/

We look forward to your attendance and participation in this event.

No More Silos! (Part 3)

Universities in an International Era.

Van Wood, Philip Morris Chair in International Business at Virginia Commonwealth University, believes that universities either need to be globalizing, or will become irrelevant. Vision and purpose matter, where faculty champions make international success happen both through their entrepreneurship and their willingness to develop partnerships and alliances

Professor Frank Franzak, of Virginia Commonwealth University who specializes in global marketing strategy, believes that in order for a globalization effort to succeed, a university must secure faculty buy-in. However, it’s difficult to sustain a long-term effort because of changes in the needs and lifestyles of individuals driving programs. Universities must learn from observations through the ongoing capturing and analysis of data.

This article is a part of a series written by Michael Czinkota and Charles Skuba who report on the March 2013 meeting on trade policy and international marketing, a collaboration between the American Marketing Association, Georgetown University and the U.S. International Trade Administration. View part 2 hereGuest writer Charles Skuba teaches international business and marketing at Georgetown University. He served in the George W. Bush Administration in trade policy positions in the U.S. Department of Commerce.

 

No More Silos! (Part 1)

A March 2013 meeting on trade policy and international marketing – hosted by the American Marketing Association, Georgetown University, and the U.S. International Trade Administration – was designed to let fresh air into the mature structures of human activity, to understand what markets, customers and suppliers need, and to appreciate the interconnectedness. No more silos!

Why is international marketing of great importance?

For one, the opportunities are there: 95 % of the world’s population lives outside of the United States. We are facing a tipping point for emergent and growing demand from all of these people, and we need to compete for interest and purchases.

International marketing also represents a strong footstool with three legs— policy, business and academia—and our meeting addressed them simultaneously. We further reinforced these three legs by looking at issues from 17 country views. If you consider the issue of computer security from a U.S. and from a Chinese perspective, different viewpoints will emerge quite quickly. This tells us that unless we communicate and understand each other’s perspectives, there is little chance of making progress.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of when both the Commerce Department and the business and academic sectors first looked jointly at trade policy and international marketing. It made sense to revisit the area and to determine what we have learned, and where we need to go. These 25 years reflect a generation during which we had enormous innovations, the joining of new partners, the creation and burst of bubbles, particularly in the finance field, and a renewed emphasis on international collaboration. Subsequent posts will look at the issues that international policy and marketing leaders see as being of paramount importance.

This article is a part of a series written by Michael Czinkota and Charles Skuba who report on the March 2013 meeting on trade policy and international marketing, a collaboration between the American Marketing Association, Georgetown University and the U.S. International Trade Administration. Guest writer Charles Skuba teaches international business and marketing at Georgetown University. He served in the George W. Bush Administration in trade policy positions in the U.S. Department of Commerce.