Urgent need for data deletion in big data era

Screen Shot 2015-07-09 at 11.10.35 AM

18 years ago, I wrote fervently about the imperative of more data deletion in the Journal of International Business Studies: “The growing risk of information overload is likely to lead to the emergence of a new industry concentrated on the reduction of knowledge… Due to rising concerns in the information dissemination area, the role of privacy experts and mechanisms designed to withhold information will also be on the increase”

After six years of testing, Google finally announced the option of “undo send” in its Gmail service. However, rumors of deletion capability are vastly exaggerated.  Instead of actually “deleting” the email after sending it, the new “undo send” function just provides a time delay ranging from 5 to 30 seconds before sending out the email. Once the send button has been clicked, nothing can be “undone” after that time delay . Even now, if you accidentally send sensitive bank information to a total stranger, you still have to get a court order before Google can unsend an email full of sensitive data that  mistakenly arrived in the inbox of a wrong person.

We don’t have the slightest doubt that big data technology has played an irreplaceable role in letting economies boom. Google, for example, has collected data from Gmap in mobile phones to report accurate instant traffic information. IBM’s Watson Supercomputer collects all medical journals and clinical cases and makes them available to doctors.

 

Screen Shot 2015-07-09 at 11.09.16 AM

After Hillary Clinton’s email scandal, many people prefer a delay to a delete function in order to maintain accurate records. But for privacy’s sake, deletion may be essential. It  can take  a long time for laws to catch up with modern crimes.

Too many data can also disable people’s decision making capacity. Dr. Ron Friedman, a social psychologist on the science of workplace excellence conducted  research on how more information influences people’s decision making. We used to think that more information leads to smarter decisions. However, when data are missing, we tend to overestimate their value.

Increasingly, we can build our understanding based on data derived from applications. We will be able to compare the use of air-conditioning in Shanghai to that in Berlin. A Smart Factory can offer solutions and services to consumers in different  and changing conditions. Key obstacles are the reality of  messy information and the problem of getting rid of useless data.

Related articles:

 

If you’re a woman with big dreams you may want to move there

A recent study released by the International Labor Organization (ILO) and published by the Washington Post shows that nearly a third of all businesses around the world are now owned or managed by women. Additionally, women now hold roughly 40 percent of jobs around the globe. While these numbers may seem encouraging, there is still a long way to go. For example, in the United States, women hold less than 20 percent of all corporate board seats. In most developed countries, women are underrepresented on the boards of large corporations.

In developing countries, however, women seem to have more opportunity. Jamaica reigns supreme with close to 60 percent women managers. Colombia and Saint Lucia rank next with 53 and 52 percent respectively. Beyond these three, the Philippines comes in fourth with just under 48 percent female managers.

The countries with the lowest number of employed women managers are Yemen, Pakistan, and Algeria with 4.9, 3, and 2.1 percent of women bosses. The rest of the bottom ten are from countries in the Middle East and North Africa.

Women Employment2

Read the full report here: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2015/01/13/the-three-countries-where-your-boss-is-more-likely-to-be-a-woman/