The Effects of Consumption, Production and Temporal Migration on Global Markets

This article focuses on what we see and what we don’t see, how politics becomes the central focus   of the failing economy although it is the not its underlying cause and how we as consumers play the primary role of economic recovery. When economists do not understand the behavior and   temporal role of consumers, they risk prescribing the wrong cure for the new norm in mature economies of slow-growth GDP and fewer jobs.

Read the full article here: Temporal Migration pdf

Special thanks to Roger Blackwell for his contribution and collaboration with me on this work.

No More Silos! (Part 3)

Universities in an International Era.

Van Wood, Philip Morris Chair in International Business at Virginia Commonwealth University, believes that universities either need to be globalizing, or will become irrelevant. Vision and purpose matter, where faculty champions make international success happen both through their entrepreneurship and their willingness to develop partnerships and alliances

Professor Frank Franzak, of Virginia Commonwealth University who specializes in global marketing strategy, believes that in order for a globalization effort to succeed, a university must secure faculty buy-in. However, it’s difficult to sustain a long-term effort because of changes in the needs and lifestyles of individuals driving programs. Universities must learn from observations through the ongoing capturing and analysis of data.

This article is a part of a series written by Michael Czinkota and Charles Skuba who report on the March 2013 meeting on trade policy and international marketing, a collaboration between the American Marketing Association, Georgetown University and the U.S. International Trade Administration. View part 2 hereGuest writer Charles Skuba teaches international business and marketing at Georgetown University. He served in the George W. Bush Administration in trade policy positions in the U.S. Department of Commerce.

 

No More Silos! (Part 1)

A March 2013 meeting on trade policy and international marketing – hosted by the American Marketing Association, Georgetown University, and the U.S. International Trade Administration – was designed to let fresh air into the mature structures of human activity, to understand what markets, customers and suppliers need, and to appreciate the interconnectedness. No more silos!

Why is international marketing of great importance?

For one, the opportunities are there: 95 % of the world’s population lives outside of the United States. We are facing a tipping point for emergent and growing demand from all of these people, and we need to compete for interest and purchases.

International marketing also represents a strong footstool with three legs— policy, business and academia—and our meeting addressed them simultaneously. We further reinforced these three legs by looking at issues from 17 country views. If you consider the issue of computer security from a U.S. and from a Chinese perspective, different viewpoints will emerge quite quickly. This tells us that unless we communicate and understand each other’s perspectives, there is little chance of making progress.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of when both the Commerce Department and the business and academic sectors first looked jointly at trade policy and international marketing. It made sense to revisit the area and to determine what we have learned, and where we need to go. These 25 years reflect a generation during which we had enormous innovations, the joining of new partners, the creation and burst of bubbles, particularly in the finance field, and a renewed emphasis on international collaboration. Subsequent posts will look at the issues that international policy and marketing leaders see as being of paramount importance.

This article is a part of a series written by Michael Czinkota and Charles Skuba who report on the March 2013 meeting on trade policy and international marketing, a collaboration between the American Marketing Association, Georgetown University and the U.S. International Trade Administration. Guest writer Charles Skuba teaches international business and marketing at Georgetown University. He served in the George W. Bush Administration in trade policy positions in the U.S. Department of Commerce.

There Is Sunshine Above the Clouds (Part 10)

Part 10: Universities and Internationalization.

30 years ago, the essentials of communication were one of the main problems that CEOs had to face in their efforts with internationalization. New information technologies have brought progress leading to a substantial reduction in the transaction costs in international business. These changes in technology have been further helped by the establishment of English as the lingua franca in business and science in nearly every country in the world. This greater ease of communication already supports processes within universities through greater access to and transparency of findings.

Just like with cable television, however, it’s not just availability but content which is of major importance to the creation of value. In developing content, universities should concentrate on specific aspects in which to become multidisciplinary experts. Specialization has worked for firms, and will also provide benefits to higher education by allowing universities to provide more value added to society. It will also be important to provide the connectivity between business, research and policy. In the longer term, economic considerations or even profits by themselves are not sufficiently enticing for society to prosper.  Religion, family, culture, security and many other concerns are taken into account by voters and governments. Universities are the ones who can incorporate these multiple concerns into a systemic perspective, and thus set their thinking apart from others. They can also serve as the foundation for multilateral approaches. By doing so, universities can become the transmission belt for the internationalization of their economy.

Universities can also track international developments of knowledge, and attract or repatriate scientists from abroad as resources. Just as a soccer club attracts top level players to move into the higher league, universities can bring in international researchers to develop or fortify a strategically isolated position.

Others need to assist universities to achieve a more prominent role in international business. Firms and government need to recognize their stakeholder positions and be supportive with information, network development and funding. It will be helpful, for example, for governments to facilitate the granting of visas, the recognition of qualifications, and the issuance of residency and work permits.

Most important for all players, once they have recognized the urgent need to collaborate, will be the formation of a university memory. It would be a terrible waste to have to re-learn internationalization for every new generation of faculty members. Considering the universe is the core mission of universities. Their work on the accumulation and dissemination of knowledge about the world will let them play the societal role they deserve.

This post is the last in a series by Michael Czinkota of Georgetown University and Andreas Pinkwart of Handelshochschule Leipzig on international business research and the new role of universities. Find Part 9 here.

There Is Sunshine Above the Clouds (Part 9)

Part 9: Increasing University Appeal.

Universities have a special role to play in the development of new methods and measuring instruments. The focus on providing students and society with a special tool kit which allows others to better evaluate, understand and cope with similarities and differences will be crucial. Important is also the selection of information that firms need to know. In an era where information overload replaces information scarcity, it must become the task of universities to enable others to maximize their learning with a paucity of materials.

Universities need to demonstrate the benefits they can offer. When one considers the expansion and influence of the Roman Empire, it turns out that force played only a small role. Rather, by offering market places, roads, language, laws, and linkages, the Romans provided efficiency, safety, consistency, communication and insights within their realm.  Outsiders then were not forced to join, but did so because affiliation offered the opportunity to live a better life. Universities need to achieve such voluntary interest as well. Given their knowledge base, their human talent and their cross-disciplinary capabilities, universities need to make the cost of non-collaboration unreasonably high to firms, so that they become a sought after source and partner.

This post is part of a series by Michael Czinkota of Georgetown University and Andreas Pinkwart of Handelshochschule Leipzig on international business research and the new role of universities. Find Part 8 here.