Correlation Between International Trade and Local Transportation Employment

Source: International Trade Administration (ITA)

Despite criticism that international trade exports jobs, about 9.7 million jobs were supported solely by the export of goods and services in 2011. Normally, great attention is placed on the effects of trade on employment or wages in the manufacturing sector, overlooking the impact of trade on the transportation sector because of the many factors that affect transportation employment. But a recent study has been written examining how employment in the transportation sector can significantly be affected by international trade.

The study found the following information:

  • The expansion of U.S. exports between 2003 and 2010 added between 63,000 and 140,000 workers to the sector, with a central estimate of 101,000 workers.
  • The positive contribution of U.S. exports to transportation sector employment offsets some of the national decline in transportation employment over this period.
  • The 30.4 percent increase in the value of exports between 2003 and 2010 helped to limit the national decline in transportation employment to about one percent over this period.

To download the study click here.

[NTS Alert] Trafficking in persons: Singapore’s evolving responses

Source: The Centre for Non-Traditional Security (NTS)

For a long time, sending countries have been the focus of efforts to combat trafficking in persons (TIP). However, in recent years, destination countries such as Singapore have also stepped up their efforts. This is timely because improved recognition and management of the threat and challenges of TIP will do much to prevent the abuse and commercial exploitation of adults and children. This NTS Alert discusses the TIP phenomenon, focusing on Singapore and the significant new developments in Singapore’s policies on the issue. In particular, it highlights the establishment of Singapore’s Inter-Agency Taskforce on TIP and the development of its National Plan of Action.

To access the full report, click here.

Source: http://www.rsis.edu.sg/nts/html-newsletter/bulletin/nts-bulletin-apr-1201.html#TRANSNATIONAL

The Next Generation Needs Vision and Commitment

Source: World Economic Forum

April 18, 2012 marks the end of the World Economic Forum on Latin America 2012 in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. It concluded with a call to end “archaic thinking, outdated notions of hierarchy and the lack of dedication to excellence in education,” while promoting a “commitment to education, inclusion, social responsibility and sustainable growth” amongst young leaders.

For Latin American businesses to thrive in the global economy and in environments where there is distrust or even hostility towards private enterprise, they must be solidly focused on engaging stakeholders and incorporating the communities in which they operate into their business models. With Latin American student performing poorly in educational benchmarking assessment, the importance of raising the quality of education amongst these countries was made. In addition, the role of the Internet, social media and other communications technology was strongly emphasized. They are means that are becoming essential for stakeholder engagement and for creating conversations between people.

For more information about the meeting, please visit:www.weforum.org/latinamerica2012.
Source:http://www.weforum.org/news/next-generation-latin-american-leaders-needs-vision-and-commitment

Challenges Faced By Manufacturers Today


Source: USCIB

USCIB members took part in a panel discussion at the APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation) Regulators Forum on March 30 in Singapore, drawing attention to some of the challenges manufacturers face in many countries with respect to chemicals regulation, which is having an increasing impact on downstream users of chemicals.

For the past several years the APEC Chemical Dialogue has discussed how best to contribute to APEC’s overarching goals of trade liberalization and business facilitation throughout the Asia-Pacific region.

The discussion this time around was productive, with a consensus among participants that regulating chemicals in articles is a complicated matter, and that further discussion on the topic is needed. It revolved around how various industries are dealing with the need to communicate substances in articles along the supply chain.

To read more on the subject, click here.