Map of Countries Sized by Population & Changing Global Economy

This map was tweeted by @incrediblemaps and shows us the size of countries relative to their populations, which as we know has big implications for food security and the commodity trade markets.

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Top List of Economically Free Countries of 2013

beckeThe United States came in at number 12. The U.S. was ranked number 6 when President Barack Obama took office in 2009.

Slipping: U.S. Fails to Crack Top 10 List of Economically Free Countries

The economic freedom index, which is jointly published by the Wall Street Journal and the Heritage Foundation, ranks the top 10 countries based on the average of 10 separate measurements, including government spending, fiscal freedom, trade freedom and freedom from corruption.

America’s spot on the 20th annual index is an “unfortunate but foreseeable slide,” said Heritage President and former U.S. Senator Jim DeMint.

“It should stun everyone,” he said, noting that the U.S. has even managed to fall behind Estonia on the index.

America’s place on the index has declined steadily for the past seven years, resulting in its status as “mostly free.” The decline is due mostly to poor showings in “fiscal freedom, business freedom and property rights,” according to the index.

“Fortunately despair will never be part of what we do here at the Heritage Foundation,” DeMint said. “We’re continuing to work on those factors, those inputs, that change the total output of economic growth.”

Hong Kong, Singapore, Australia, Switzerland, New Zealand and Canada, on the other hand, all rank “free.”

Slipping: U.S. Fails to Crack Top 10 List of Economically Free Countries

America’s fall to 12th place comes even as economies in the Asia-Pacific region report slight improvements.

Lastly, the “communist nations North Korea and Cuba brought up the rear of the index. Several war-torn countries, such as Syria and Afghanistan, were not ranked,” the Washington Examinerreported.

10 Best Countries to do Business

Ever wonder where the best places to do business are? The top ten are provided below based on 2011 proxy statements.

Rank Name GDP Growth (%) GDP/Capita ($) Trade Balance as % of GDP Population (mil)
1

Canada

3.1 39,400 -3.1 34.0
2

New Zealand

1.5 27,700 -2.3 4.3
3

Hong Kong

6.8 45,900 6.6 7.1
4

Ireland

-1.0 37,300 -0.7 4.7
5

Denmark

2.1 36,600 5.5 5.5
6

Singapore

14.5 62,100 20.8 4.7
7

Sweden

5.5 39,100 6.3 9.1
8

Norway

0.4 54,600 12.9 4.7
9

United Kingdom

1.3 34,800 -2.5 62.7
10

United States

2.8 47,200 -3.2 313.2

source: www.forbes.com

See more here.

The Rationale for Export Promotion : Part 1

Exports are important. Yet, why should firms be enticed into exporting through the use
of public funds? Profit opportunities for exporters should be enough of an
incentive for firms to export. To explore this issue, I will use our Georgetown University research, which was  initially published in the AMA  Journal of  International Marketing.  First off, it is helpful to understand the export process within the firm. Typically, firms evolve along different stages to become experienced exporters. They start out being uninterested in things international. Management frequently will not even fill an unsolicited export order. Should  international market stimuli continue over time, however, a firm may move to the stage of export awareness, or even export interest. Management will begin to accumulate information about international markets and may consider the feasibility of exporting. At the export trial stage, the firm will fill selected export orders, serve a few customers, and expand into countries that are geographically close or culturally similar to the home country. At the export
evaluation stage, firms consider the impact of exporting on overall corporate
activities. Unless initial expectations are met, the firm is likely to discontinue its export efforts, seek alternative international growth opportunities or restrict itself to the domestic market. Success will lead the firm over time, to become an export adapter, make frequent shipments to many customers in more countries, and incorporate international considerations into its planning.

By: Michael R. Czinkota