Breakfast of Champions


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Breakfast

On Monday (11th December, 2017) morning we hosted a get together for selected post graduate students.  These were drawn from course reps but also selected by Program Directors who identified individuals whose contribution to the programs was really making a difference.   Students were asked to offer brief feedback on…

– I feel good, because….

– I’d love to do more of….

– my best class experience was…

– on Campus, I enjoy most…

– millennials need classes to focus on ….

– …. will help me most with a job

Things students said in their two minute talk included:

  • I feel good being part of an academic community.
  • Each day, I improve.
  • Kent offers an entrepreneurial course, designed around asking professionals in the finance industry. As such, not only do I get academic skills but I’m gaining professional skills too.
  • I value the Bloomberg Room.
  • Professors are all very helpful and I’m learning relevant skills
  • Being on the program gives me different cultural perspectives.
  • I have found seminars really help me in developing my skills – it’s great to talk with so many different nationalities.

Thanks to Michael for his idea, for organizing the medals and for being thoroughly affable. Thanks to Tamsin for helping with arrangements.  Thanks also to Martin, Radu, Jaideep, Shaomin, Omar, Irena and Maddy for coming along.

Religions, Christmas, and International Marketing


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Historically, the religious tradition in the United States, based on Christianity and Judaism, has emphasized hard work, thrift, and a simple lifestyle. These religious values have certainly evolved over time; many of our modern marketing activities would not exist if these older values had persisted. Thrift, for instance, presumes that a person will save hard-earned wages and use these savings for purchases later on. Today, Americans take full advantage of the ample credit facilities that are available to them. The credit card is such a vital part of the American lifestyle that saving before buying seems archaic. Most Americans feel no guilt in driving a big SUV or generously heating a large house.

Christmas is one Christian tradition that remains an important event for many consumer goods industries in all Christian countries. Retailers have their largest sales around that time. However, Christmas is a good illustration of the substantial differences that still exist among even predominantly Christian societies. A large U.S.-based retailer of consumer electronics discovered these differences the hard way when it opened its first retail outlet in the Netherlands. The company planned the opening to coincide with the start of the Christmas selling season and bought advertising space accordingly for late November and December, as retailers do in the United States. The results proved less than satisfactory. Major gift giving in Holland takes place, not around December 25, Christmas Day, but on St. Nicholas Day, December 6. Therefore, the opening of the company’s retail operation was late and missed the major buying season.

From a marketing point of view, Christmas has increasingly become a global phenomenon. For many young Chinese, Christmas is not regarded as a religious holiday but simply represents “fun.” Fashionable bars charge up to $25 for entrance on Christmas Eve, and hotel restaurants charge $180 for a Christmas Eve function. The week around Christmas is the top grossing week for movie theaters in China, as young Chinese head out to theaters together instead of watching pirated DVDs at home. Santa Claus is increasing in popularity in the predominantly Sunni Muslim country of Turkey. In Istanbul shopping centers, children stand in line to sit on Santa’s lap and ask for gifts. Stores sell Santa suits and statues.

With billions of people celebrating Christmas and exchanging wishes of peace, perhaps we will see at least some of the inspired and faithful take personal steps which reduce the barbarities which humanity commits against itself in the many ongoing wars. Also, a time of remembrance of the difficult travels of Joseph and Mary, with Jesus soon to be born, might help us soften our stance against refugees and migrants in the world. Remember, we all – but for the mercy of God- could be the ones looking for succor and support.

Here is a holiday greeting from Prof. Czinkota and Prof. Skuba.

Merry Christmas!

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Pizza
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Global Business: Why Culture Matters

When it comes to business, there is more than one important facet to creating a successful and productive company. Most importantly, is the part culture plays. Think about it. Culture, defined, is an integrated system of learned behavior patterns that are characteristic of the members of any given society, and culture is thus shared through various groups of shared interests. Essentially, it’s the things people share together; language, social cues, behaviors, religions, and even various attitudes and manners that are accepted. In order to produce a successful business globally, you must learn these special aspects of culture, otherwise, you risk not only embarrassing yourself, but loosing an important deal.

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