Migration from less developed economies and its effect on corporate and individual international business performance

Our Special Initiative: Immigration and Immigrant Integration Through Trade

Migration from less developed economies and its effect on corporate and individual international business performance

Michael R. Czinkota

Gary Knight

Zaheer Khan

 

Project Abstract:

Professors Czinkota of Georgetown University, Knight of Williamette University and Khan of the University of Kent have initiated theories on entry strategies into international markets. Czinkota co-developed the ‘stage theory of internationalization’ where firms typically enter markets abroad over two years. Knight co-developed the ‘born global’ theory, where improved communication enhances access to international markets right from firm foundation. Khan specializes in trade from emerging economies towards wealthy nations. We intend to marry our theories with analyses of immigrants and immigration to clarify immigrant contribution to international trade.

Globalization has been associated with widespread migration of people moving from less developed to developed economies for political, economic, or social reasons. Business survival is a major factor that predicts the success of immigrant entrepreneurs and of immigrants generally, in the U.S. Recent statistics indicated that more than 12 percent of residents in the U.S. are immigrants. Remittances sent home by migrants are substantial, and often represent a significant proportion of home country gross national product. In general, migrants play important roles in their host countries. For example, migrants in the U.S. operate as entrepreneurs, investors in capital markets, tourists, volunteers, and advocates. They bring various assets, resources, international experience, social networks, a sense of patriotism and social cohesion, bridges to foreign investors, and entrepreneurial knowledge and experience. Many such migrants draw on resources from their home and host countries to economically adapt to the U.S., and launch new businesses by becoming entrepreneurs. These transnational entrepreneurs often launch businesses that involve trade and investment between the United States and the migrants’ home countries

For more detail please go to the URL listed below:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/f50af8icq2qr8ug/Migration%20from%20less%20developed%20economies%20and%20its%20effect%20on%20corporate%20and.docx?dl=0

The Rising Cost of Freedom

We are finding that the cost of freedom seems to be increasing lately. Terms like free trade or free choice have been misleading since they all come with a price, which international marketers pay in terms of preparing their shipments, scrutinizing their customers, and conforming to government regulations of tariffs or taxes. They pay ofr it when subsidies are reduced and markets are opened further, resulting in more intense competition.

Now prices are going up when international marketers have to file special paperwork or comply with security guidelines, which slow down the flow of merchandise. Every time a shipment is delayed, international transactions are less profitable and the subsequent business dealings become less competitive. Customers talk about unmet expectations and domestic firms point to the vagaries of itnernational markets.

We are all paying a higher price due to global terrorism, which has permeated the global marketplace. In most instances, terrorism is not an outgrowth of choice but rather the lack of it. Terrorists may succeed in reducing the freedom of others but not in increasing their own. The prinicpal choices played out between those exercising terrorism and those exposed to it are those consistent with economic theory of return on investment. When terrorists select targets in response to governmental implementation of anti-terrorism policies, the harder targets are likely to motivate them to go for easier ones. Increased protection of past targets may result in attacks on new and unexpected targets that are more likely to succeed. Similarly, if terrorists can no longer enter a country, they may attack that country’s symbols and representatives abroad. If embassies are then more secured and fortified, terrorists may attack that nation’s individuals and companies.

Who is typically most affected by terrorist acts? Attacks aimed at business, such as the infamous bombings of U.S. franchises abroad do not bring MNCs to their knees. The local participants, the local employees, the local investors and the local customers are affected most. Who can protect tehmselves against such attacks and who can afford to protect targets? Only the more wealthy countries and companies can. They have the choice of where to place etheir funds, with whom to trade, and whether to hold the enemy at bay through a security bubble created via exports, a franchise, or a wholly owned subsidiary. The poor players do not have any choices and ther alternatives are not improved by any gruesome act. The local firms, the nations with economies in development, and the poor customers continue to be out there, exposed to further acts of terrorism without the ability to influence events.

But international marketing can enable the disenfranchised to develop alternatives. As suggested by Prahalad and Hammond (2002), multinational firms can invest in the world’s poorest markets and increase their own revenue while reducing poverty. With support from shareholders and the benefit of good governance, marketers can, and should continue in their role as social change agents. It should be kept in mind that international marketing has value maximization at its heart. If it is worthwhile to fulfill the needs of large segments of people even at low margins, then it will be done.