Spring 2018: Marketing Across Borders Syllabus

 

For the Spring 2018 semester, Prof. Michael Czinkota of the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University, offers a course on “Marketing Across Borders”.

The course will cover the internationalization and intersection of business and marketing. We will understand the global environment drivers and directions for business, and how policy frameworks are shaped around them, being affected by key variables such as culture and behavior. We will introduce living cases to offer examples of the topics we cover.

Storytelling and interaction will be dynamics of the course, with an emphasis on small and medium sized firms. We will also use learning exercises such as video productions and elevator pitches.

Below you can  find a more detailed syllabus of the course. In the following link you can see a video of Prof. Czinkota welcoming you to the course: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OebH1ikkF3o

If you are a Georgetown University student, hurry up and sign up to the course and join us.

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Michael Czinkota teaches international business and trade at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business and the University of Kent. His key (with Ilkka Ronkainen) book is “International Marketing” (10th ed., CENGAGE).

Welcome to Marketing Across Borders

Prof. Czinkota welcomes the students of his Spring 2018 course in McDonough School Of Business of Georgetown University, “Marketing Across Borders”

Syllabus for International Business Course – STRT-261-01

For those who are interested, I am teaching a course on International Business at the McDonough School of Business this Spring. The final syllabus for the course is as follows –

 

Updated_ Syllabus IB SPRING 2016

 

Lunch with Dr. Theo Weigel

On the first of October, Professor Michael Czinkota hosted a private lunch with Dr. Theo Weigel at the McDonough School of Business, in collaboration with the Washington D.C. office of the Hanns-Seidel Foundation. Dr. Weigel served as the German Minister of Finance from 1989 to 1998, in the Cabinet of Chancellor Helmut Kohl. He was instrumental in the creation of the European monetary union, and the common currency. He was accompanied by a team of delegates that included his wife, Irene Epple-Weigel, the former alpine skier and Olympic medalist, and their son, Konstantin, a law student in Munich. Also part of the delegation was Richard Teltschik, the Director of the Hanns-Seidel Foundation in Washington. Georgetown University was represented also by Professors Thomas Cooke, Ricardo Ernst, Charles Skuba, David Walker, and Lee Pinkowitz. Also in attendance were three students – one from the McDonough School of Business, and two Masters candidates from the Walsh School of Foreign Service. Additional visitors came from the Hanns-Seidel Foundation and the German Embassy.

The lunch was inaugurated by Professor Czinkota, who gave a welcome address that included an introduction of Dr. Weigel’s many accomplishments. Following this, Dr. Weigel addressed the attendees of the lunch. He discussed his experiences with the creation and establishment of the Euro, relating both facts and anecdotes. One such story was of how the common currency came to be known as the “Euro,” rather than the other alternatives under consideration at the time, such as the Frank, Mark or ECU. He vehemently denied the common perception that the Euro was Germany’s reward of others for support of reunification, asserting that the two momentous events were planned and executed separately. Dr. Weigel talked about the fall of the Berlin Wall and the reunification of West and East Germany, at what was the eve of the 25th anniversary of the reunification. Yet it was not only German history that was discussed at the lunch, but also contemporary German politics and European current affairs. The issue of the refugee crisis in Europe was explored by Dr. Weigel as well as the other participants. Dr. Weigel believes that Germany can absorb the current volume of incoming refugees, approximately 800,000, for one year (possibly two). This will help the German economy, which is currently facing a demographic shortage of working-age and job-seeking citizens. Any absorption of refugees beyond this number, however, would end up harming the German economy.

For more than an hour, issues such as U.S.-Germany relations, collaborations and perceptions by the youth of the two countries, and Germany’s leadership role in the world were addressed in the question and answer session following Dr. Weigel’s speech.

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