Sometimes even rankings can be Christmas presents

GoogleRankingCongratulations to Professor Dr. Michael R. Czinkota on being recognized as one of the world’s leading authors on international business and marketing for publications during the period 1980-2015! Throughout the 35 years, Professor Czinkota has always stayed in the top 20 of the prolific authors list from different sources.

“An analysis of significant contributions to the international business literature” in the Journal of International Business Studies rated Professor Czinkota among the top 3 most prolific authors worldwide, 1980-1989.

An analysis in the Asian Pacific Journal of Management ranked Professor Czinkota as #4 in the Journal of World Business, #7 in the Journal of International Marketing and #14 in all 6 leading business journals in the world for the time period 1996-2006.

More recently, Professor Czinkota was recognized among the top 8 pioneering researchers in international marketing around the world. He was also ranked among the top 20 most prolific international marketing authors during the period 1995-2015 in an anthology by Leonidou, Katsikeas, Samiee and Aykol. (2018)

In December 2017 – right before Christmas, Professor Czinkota occupied the first place of Global Google citations for export promotion and export management. He also ranked in second place for trade policy and place 8 for International Marketing, which is an exciting present for Christmas.

Professor Czinkota teaches at the McDonough School of Business of Georgetown University and at the Kent Business School, University of Kent. He was awarded the Significant Contribution to Global Marketing award by the American Marketing Association in 2007. Professor Czinkota is the co-author of International Marketing, 10th Edition, Cengage (with I. Ronkainen); International Business, 8th Edition, Wiley (with I. Ronkainen and M. Moffett) and Fundamentals of International Business, 6th Edition, (with I. Ronkainen and M. Moffett), Wessex. His blog also was named the third most successful international business blog.

Religions, Christmas, and International Marketing


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Historically, the religious tradition in the United States, based on Christianity and Judaism, has emphasized hard work, thrift, and a simple lifestyle. These religious values have certainly evolved over time; many of our modern marketing activities would not exist if these older values had persisted. Thrift, for instance, presumes that a person will save hard-earned wages and use these savings for purchases later on. Today, Americans take full advantage of the ample credit facilities that are available to them. The credit card is such a vital part of the American lifestyle that saving before buying seems archaic. Most Americans feel no guilt in driving a big SUV or generously heating a large house.

Christmas is one Christian tradition that remains an important event for many consumer goods industries in all Christian countries. Retailers have their largest sales around that time. However, Christmas is a good illustration of the substantial differences that still exist among even predominantly Christian societies. A large U.S.-based retailer of consumer electronics discovered these differences the hard way when it opened its first retail outlet in the Netherlands. The company planned the opening to coincide with the start of the Christmas selling season and bought advertising space accordingly for late November and December, as retailers do in the United States. The results proved less than satisfactory. Major gift giving in Holland takes place, not around December 25, Christmas Day, but on St. Nicholas Day, December 6. Therefore, the opening of the company’s retail operation was late and missed the major buying season.

From a marketing point of view, Christmas has increasingly become a global phenomenon. For many young Chinese, Christmas is not regarded as a religious holiday but simply represents “fun.” Fashionable bars charge up to $25 for entrance on Christmas Eve, and hotel restaurants charge $180 for a Christmas Eve function. The week around Christmas is the top grossing week for movie theaters in China, as young Chinese head out to theaters together instead of watching pirated DVDs at home. Santa Claus is increasing in popularity in the predominantly Sunni Muslim country of Turkey. In Istanbul shopping centers, children stand in line to sit on Santa’s lap and ask for gifts. Stores sell Santa suits and statues.

With billions of people celebrating Christmas and exchanging wishes of peace, perhaps we will see at least some of the inspired and faithful take personal steps which reduce the barbarities which humanity commits against itself in the many ongoing wars. Also, a time of remembrance of the difficult travels of Joseph and Mary, with Jesus soon to be born, might help us soften our stance against refugees and migrants in the world. Remember, we all – but for the mercy of God- could be the ones looking for succor and support.

Here is a holiday greeting from Prof. Czinkota and Prof. Skuba.

Merry Christmas!

Good Corporate Citizenry, No Longer a Choice But a Necessity

By Victoria Galeano & Jerry Haar

When queried at a 1909 business meeting about the choice of colors available for his automobiles, Henry Ford replied that customers could have any color they wanted as long as it is black. Fast forward to the late 20th and early 21st centuries and consumers today are now in the driver’s seat (no pun intended). Publications such as Consumer Reports, CNET, and a myriad of other independent professional and consumer reviews of goods and services empower buyers, dictating to producers the style, features, and price ranges that consumers seek.

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New Thinking on Immigration

President Trump endorsed the RAISE Act; Reforming American Immigration for Strong Employment. This key new immigration legislation would aim to create a better screening process for who is allowed into the country. Priority would be given to those applicants who speak English, are financially self sufficient, and raise the national level of capability. A point based system (for example a Nobel Prize is worth 25 points) will help prioritize the extent of access and award of green cards to the United States. Countries such as Australia are already using such a assessment of value to society when issuing entry permits.

The bill is still quite a ways away from becoming law, which requires passage by Congress. But clearly it contributes to a useful national debate on immigration. For the time being,. RAISE aims to restrict new immigrants which depend on welfare, as well as protect US citizens from having their jobs threatened. For more details of the Bill please click here

Great Things Can Happen and Not Just for America

When President Trump attended the G20 meeting in Hamburg, Germany, the aspects publicly reported were mainly uncontrolled demonstrators, burning Porsche cars and police at the end of their rope. Few benefits were attributed to the meeting. That is incorrect.

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