A SUMMER IN CANTERBURY

Canterbury-Cathedral-460x306Scholars typically spend their summers at interesting and learn-worthy organizations. For my summer this year such destination will be the University of Kent in Canterbury, UK. There I will participate in several events. I will be help coordinate a university-wide international business seminar: Global Business in a Dynamic Environment. In addition, I will be chairing the scientific council of the 1st International Doctoral Conference “Socializing Business Research: Connecting and Advancing Knowledge” at Kent Business School.

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OECD proposals to have impact on transfer pricing in India

NEW DELHI: Once implemented, the measures proposed by OECD to curb tax avoidance activities would have “far reaching implications” in India’s transfer pricing landscape as well as a significant impact on US multinationals with overseas operations, according to experts.

Paris-based Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), which sets the global tax standards, published a seven-point BEPS ( Base Erosion and Profit Sharing) recommendations on Tuesday.

Companies having international operations would have to work towards not only adhering to compliance obligations but also review the operating structures in various jurisdictions, he said in a statement.
The proposals, which have been prepared after extensive consultations with various stakeholders including G20 nations.

Read Full Article in The Economic Times

World Bank: THE SMALL ENTREPRENEUR IN FRAGILE AND CONFLICT-AFFECTED SITUATIONS

The new report by World Bank is part of a broader effort by the World Bank Group to understand the motives and challenges of small entrepreneurs in fragile and conflict-affected situations (FCS). The report’s key finding is that, compared to entrepreneurs elsewhere, entrepreneurs in FCS have different characteristics, face significantly different challenges, and thus may be subject to different incentives and have different motives.

Therefore, it is recommended that both the current analytical approach and the operational strategy of the World Bank be informed by the findings that follow. The publication is organized in the following manner: (i)

Overview of the Entrepreneur’s Challenges in FCS; (ii) Observations of FCS Firms, Sectors, and Business

Environments; (iii) Implications of findings; and (iv) Conclusions and Recommendations. Included are also appendices, boxes, figures, and tables.

FCS Firm Characteristics

The report summarizes findings of recent World Bank Enterprise Surveys (ES) conducted across Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), Asia, and the Eastern Europe and Central Asia (ECA) Region as well as Doing Business indicators and additional World Bank Group studies and field observations. The report finds that the majority of entrepreneurs in FCS countries are small, informal, and concentrated in the trade/services sectors. According to the ES, and after controlling for the level of development (that is, GDP per capita),

1. The average FCS firm in SSA and the ECA Region2 produces less output than non-FCS firms.

2. The average FCS firm in ECA is by 20 percent less likely to innovate (that is, to introduce/upgrade new products and services) than its non-FCS counterpart.

3. FCS firms start smaller and grow significantly more slowly, or even shrink (in the number of employees) over time, compared to non-FCS firms in the Regions analyzed.

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Mobile: The New Driver of Economy

https://www.reportbuyer.com/product/2262904/Global-Mobile-Industry-The-New-Driver-of-Economy.html

While the developed world is experiencing subscribers and connections growth stagnation, there is huge growth potential in the developing countries, especially in the Asia-Pacific and African regions. As fixed lines often remain underdeveloped and inaccessible to the majority of the population, there is a paradigm shift towards mobile phones.

With global mobile penetration reaching an all time high at 96 percent, almost half of the world’s population is using mobile communication. Globally, there were 3.4 billion unique mobile subscribers and 6.9 billion SIM connections in 2013, with an average of 1.8 active SIM cards per unique subscriber.

The number of mobile broadband connections has also grown astoundingly to well over two billion in 2013 from 364 million in 2009. This growth is expected to continue and India is predicted to be the second largest mobile broadband market by 2016, with 367 million connections, following China with 639 million connections.
According to the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), 3G mobile network covers 45 percent of the world’s population in 159 countries. In addition, 4G technology is already available in some countries. Mobile manufacturing company, Ericsson, has forecasted that by 2017, 85 percent of the world’s population will be covered by high-speed mobile networks.

Higher speed networks and more advanced devices are enabling the growth of various applications such as video streaming, internet browsing and file downloads. At a global level, the rate of growth in data traffic is likely to surpass the growth in mobile connections.
Moreover, the Global System for Mobiles Association (GSMA) states that global mobile operators have spent over USD 1 trillion in the last six years. Investment has been focused both on improving network coverage and on facilitating the growth in mobile broadband connections. Going forward, telecom companies are expected to invest around USD 1.7 trillion by 2020.

The prospect of economic growth through mobiles is extremely bright, but it also has a range of new challenges. At a global level, one in six people will be over 60 in the next decade, which will have a tremendous impact on core public services such as healthcare at a time when there are likely to be ongoing pressures on government spending and mobile can help in delivering the health service with the use of m-Healthcare. Innovation in technology presents the opportunity to address these pressing needs of society. When coupled with innovations in big data analytics, cloud computing and 3D printing, the opportunity to connect the physical and the digital provides a unique platform to improve the quality of life and productivity.

World Bank forums see youth as global changemakers

By Michael Marshall for UPI.com

An international group of young professionals, entrepreneurs, social activists, and student leaders showcased the role of youth in global development through forums at the World Bank forums on youth service and entrepreneurship.

“Without the involvement of young people in areas that affect them it will be difficult for countries to move forward,” said Evans Musonde from Zambia. He represented the Africa Peace Service Corps that is working to integrate the societies on east and southern Africa through cross-border youth service exchanges.

Karen Scheuerer of the U.S. Peace Corps said, “We see youth as change makers.” She noted the Peace Corps efforts to promote youth entrepreneurship. About three-quarters of the people the Peace Corps works with are youth.

H.E. Olive Wonekha, Uganda’s ambassador to the U.S., said that countries like hers needed a shift from donor aid to more international trade and investment. Uganda needed to develop a core of young entrepreneurs to facilitate this development.

Speakers also stressed the importance of international exchanges and fellowships in developing the skills of young entrepreneurs and leaders in the developing world.

The forums are part of the 4th International Young Leaders Assembly that brings together 800 young leaders from over 60 countries for programs in Washington, DC, Philadelphia, and New York at the U.N. from August 11-20.

Read more: http://www.upi.com/Top_News/Analysis/2014/08/17/World-Bank-forums-see-youth-as-global-changemakers/1421408154721/#ixzz3AkiPfSvQ