INTERNATIONAL MARKETING Transformation and Adaptation over Time Part 3

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Please find below the third and final part of my presentation from my International Marketing speech at the 13th Annual Conference of the EuroMed Academy of Business in Cyprus on September 9th. It describes the transition from the old to the new pillars of marketing and its implications.

Please feel free to leave your comments below and hope you enjoy it.

slides-part-3-CZ

Global Business: Trade, Broken Down

In business, trade is a big word. Not in the sense of how you spell it, but rather how we use it, as there are many compartments to trading with different countries. From exports, to labor, to production and prices, trade isn’t just the exchanging of goods. Lets break it down and use the example of clothing.

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Global Business: Why Culture Matters

When it comes to business, there is more than one important facet to creating a successful and productive company. Most importantly, is the part culture plays. Think about it. Culture, defined, is an integrated system of learned behavior patterns that are characteristic of the members of any given society, and culture is thus shared through various groups of shared interests. Essentially, it’s the things people share together; language, social cues, behaviors, religions, and even various attitudes and manners that are accepted. In order to produce a successful business globally, you must learn these special aspects of culture, otherwise, you risk not only embarrassing yourself, but loosing an important deal.

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A Wall: Constrain, Protect, or Lead

Source: ChinaDaily

Picture Source: ChinaDaily- Cracks appear in the Great Firewall of China

“God created the world, the rest was made in China,” sings Lourd de Veyra. The concern about the Asian factory has lingered for decades. Overlooked has been its gradual strategic transformation from imitator to integrator, or even innovator.

Will China overtake the U.S. and become the new No.1 economy of the world? This anxiety seems as misplaced as earlier forecasts such as Japan’s economy surpassing the U.S. by 2000.

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