Cause-Related Marketing in International Business: What Works and What Doesn’t?

Recently, I co-authored “Cause-Related Marketing in International Business: What Works and What Doesn’t?”with Prof. Demetris Vrontis, Prof. Alkis Thrassou, Dr. Michael Christofi, and Dr. S. M. Riad Shams. The paper is published in the International Marketing Review. 

We brought together empirical and theoretical advancements connecting the research gap of cause-related marketing (CRM) changes in the international context. We also focused on how extant and emergent variables and constructs can be leveraged in order to develop insights into what does and what does not work in international business in the context of CRM.

An Early Announcement Academy of Marketing Science World Congress University of Kent Canterbury, UK, July 20-23, 2021

Kent Business School, University of Kent, UK- World Marketing Congress

The 2021 Congress will provide an opportunity to connect with marketing scholars and colleagues from around the globe. It will provide a supportive forum for insightful ideas and engaging discussions about topics across the marketing spectrum through expert panel sessions, special topic sessions and peer-reviewed, cutting edge research presentations.

The Congress will be held at Kent Business School’s (University of Kent) Canterbury campus located in the historic and picturesque city of Canterbury in the UK. Canterbury is located an hour from London and has equally close connections to continental Europe (it is quicker to get to Paris from Canterbury than it is to get to Manchester!). It is home to UNESCO World Heritage Sites such as Canterbury Cathedral and has a unique place in the history of England through these connections and others. Written about and frequented by authors such as Chaucer and Dickens, the City has a long and deep-rooted history. For a small city, it punches above its weight and has much to offer!

Program Chairs 

 Call for Papers (some details subject to change)

In search for the soul of Marketing

Through the poetry of St John Henry Newman and the composition of Edward Elgar, we are offered a vision about the nature of one’s “soul” as the very essence of their living being. In light of rapid technological and societal change, we may ask questions about the “soul” of our discipline; the body of marketing changes shape rapidly, however, we should not lose sight of its soul. “Where is the life we have lost in living? Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge? Where is the knowledge we have lost in information?” So asked the great poet TS Elliott in 1934. These questions are more applicable now than ever, in our data-driven world where technology has proliferated and become ubiquitous, and where a myriad of global challenges are at the forefront of our minds.  

Set within the historic City of Canterbury (Kent, UK) we invite you to come and contemplate these challenges in the footsteps of Chaucer, Dickens, Austen and others. Home to three UNESCO World Heritage Sites and at the center of the “Garden of England”, the Congress offers a unique setting to explore these themes within an hour of London and with close connections to continental Europe. 

The “soul” centers our activities and inspirations. Leading on from prior congress themes about “discovery with social impact” and “enlightened marketing”, the AMS WMC 2021 will provide an ideal opportunity for a marketing “pilgrimage” where scholars can reflect on and share ideas about the changing nature and “soul” of marketing as a discipline, in a collegial and open forum. New knowledge tackling global and economic challenges will be developed, presented and explored, continuing a tradition of collegial debate around the concept of marketing and its contribution to business and society at large, further strengthening our academic community. 

A search for the soul of marketing which in a setting like Canterbury and its Cathedral will certainly provide us with many opportunities for new thought and actions. For any queries please contact the conference committee. We all look forward to seeing you in Canterbury. 

International Marketing & Terrorism

In this video, Prof.Czinkota reminds the public that Terrorism is not  far from us, even more, it is a significant issue in international marketing.  Not only are emerging economies threatened by the rise of terrorism, but developed economies will be affected as well.Terrorism preparedness matters! 

A World without international marketing?

A World without international marketing?

-Michael R. Czinkota

 Sometimes we only know what we lost when it has left us. I put this thought to the test it in my class of Georgetown University students. In our course “Marketing Across Borders”, we worked on the question: “What would life look like without international marketing?”. The answers offered various perspectives reflecting their interest and training in international affairs. The range was broad, addressing the impact of international marketing in the context of diversity, choices, cultural exchange, and international quality standards.

            On a personal level, students saw substantial impact of international marketing on their lives. Some mentioned that international marketing and its activities creates thousands of jobs around the world.This was seen as highly relevant to themselves, but they included their parents as well since such a change clearly involved today and the future. Some students said that without International Marketing a life would be simpler but not necessarily in a good way. International Marketing was seen to bring to life a variety of products that enrich consumers and make them more productive.

Some respondents highlighted the exposure to new thoughts and ideas that International Marketing brings to people around the world. Such exposure motivates the competition between companies to supply better quality combined with better value. This competition leads to innovation in products across different markets around the world. Without International Marketing, the high quality standards we have today would diminish due to decreasing competition.

            Companies would also feel  the absence of International Marketing. Expansion across borders will be harder and would have to rely without marketing heavily on word of mouth communication. Exports and imports will be far less than today’s value since international activities will be less profitable. Selling products to other cultures in which they are not interested will be difficult. Companies will have fewer opportunities to learn and develop from others as well. Problems will be caused by a lack of willingness to adjust or a lack of motivation to develop and compete. In consequence, the world won’t be as efficient as today.

            There was the hypothesis that International Marketing is likely to reduce poverty and increase international cooperation. These benefits would disappear when foreign direct investment decreases. Sales in foreign markets would diminish without the lubricating effect of international marketing. Less cultural awareness of others would be the consequence of a decline in intercultural communication. Companies would be less socially responsible and transparent as they won’t be inspired by other international companies who serve international communities. This would newly insert more psychic distance between cultures and countries, and reduce the attention paid to common problems and actions taken for the public good.

            Finally, we explored what students would miss most, where does the pain threshold begin: We know about the wide variety of products that are moved and brought to market thanks to marketing. So how about the loss of video games, cars, music tourism or even commercials. These items were touched on, but the core of items one would miss the most were Food, Food, and Food again.  Students were quite varied in their thinking as long as the items whose loss was deplored dealt with sustenance or alimentation. Leading among products held dear were chocolate, snacks, noodles, candies and anything else which could be eaten by chopstick. Quite a broad base from students whose parents were only introduced to new eating utensils. Food and its variety tend to give staying power to globalization and also encourage cross fertilization. Let it give new opportunity to a life with spice.

Michael Czinkota teaches international business and trade at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business and the University of Kent. His key book (with Ilkka Ronkainen) is “International Marketing” (10th ed., CENGAGE).