Spring 2018: Marketing Across Borders Syllabus


For the Spring 2018 semester, Prof. Michael Czinkota of the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University, offers a course on “Marketing Across Borders”.

The course will cover the internationalization and intersection of business and marketing. We will understand the global environment drivers and directions for business, and how policy frameworks are shaped around them, being affected by key variables such as culture and behavior. We will introduce living cases to offer examples of the topics we cover.

Storytelling and interaction will be dynamics of the course, with an emphasis on small and medium sized firms. We will also use learning exercises such as video productions and elevator pitches.

Below you can  find a more detailed syllabus of the course. In the following link you can see a video of Prof. Czinkota welcoming you to the course: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OebH1ikkF3o

If you are a Georgetown University student, hurry up and sign up to the course and join us.

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Michael Czinkota teaches international business and trade at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business and the University of Kent. His key (with Ilkka Ronkainen) book is “International Marketing” (10th ed., CENGAGE).

Welcome to Marketing Across Borders

Prof. Czinkota welcomes the students of his Spring 2018 course in McDonough School Of Business of Georgetown University, “Marketing Across Borders”

Mr. J. Michael Farrell Concluding the First Year Seminar

At the end of the Fall semester seminar, we had the great pleasure of welcoming Mr. J. Michael Farrell.


Mr. J. Michael Farrell is the principal of the Law Offices of J. Michael Farrell. He specializes in international arbitration proceedings before the International Court of Arbitration as operated by the International Chamber of Commerce, the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law and the American Arbitration Association. Mr. Farrell was a member of the National Commission on Libraries and Information Science. In 1992, he was designated by the President as Chairman of the Commission. In 1992, the President appointed Mr. Farrell as Commissioner of the United States of America on the Commission for the Study of Alternatives to the Panama Canal. The Commission was composed of representatives from the Governments of Japan, Panama and the United States. In 1993, he became Chairman of the Commission. From February 1988 through August 1991, Mr. Farrell was a Deputy Commissioner on the Commission, having been appointed by President Reagan. He was appointed by the Secretary of Energy as a member of the National Petroleum Council. He is a Director of the US-Panama Business Council, Institute for the Study of Diplomacy (Georgetown University) and the Air Force Academy Foundation. He also served as Deputy Head of the office of Presidential Personnel. 

Mr. Farrell presented his views about sanctions and international business. He offered some of his high level experiences and engaged the students in a conversation about their aspirations and career paths.


By the end of the class, Prof. Czinkota gave out certificates to the students for their excellence and engagement in the class.

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For the rest of the pictures of the student, please click here.

To know more about the First Year Seminar’s content and previous guests, please click here.

Pressure by Cuba will not pay off

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This past week, United States relations with Cuba were back in the spotlight. The Trump administration announced new restrictions on travel and trade with Cuba. The rollback of Obama’s measures towards the island’s government is a promise President Trump had made some months ago. The steps are reasonable, since  Obama’s agreement with Cuba was insufficient  and inequitable. The U.S. gave much and received little in return.

It has been more than a year since the normalization of relations. Clearly, Cuba has been unwilling to change rapidly, and past treaties were insufficiently in achieving a new robust track. One example is the continued discriminatory practices against Americans in the island. On a recently booked trip I had to Cuba, for example, it turned out that hotel rates were unjustifiably much higher for Americans than for Europeans, so I cancelled my plans.

The intention of the hotel was to give a silent retaliation for the years of economic embargo. The focus was on individuals that had no say on the matter and also no ability to change or improve American relations with Havana.

In fact, with the new tight restrictions, American individuals can no longer visit Cuba and groups need a license from the Treasury Department to visit the country. The Cuban tourism industry will feel the effects of U.S. government encouragement of Americans to stay in private houses and avoid hotels and restaurants connected to or owned by the military and security services.

After decades of adverse relationships, isn’t it time to bury the hatchet and bring out the peace pipe. For that, Cuba needs to take a step back and accept new policies which are fair, non-discriminatory and welcoming to visitors, both American and Cuban alike. As a fair trade and commerce relationship is not yet a reality, the United States government needed to demonstrate a stronger position in order to encourage appropriateness.

In addition, it is important to note that seeking improved relations with Havana does not mean forgetting the violations against human and civil rights during the Castro government. The population’s welfare is equally relevant as economic aspects in diplomatic relations, and actions such as expropriations and unjustified prison sentences should still be remembered and repaired. Curative marketing evaluates, carries physical accosting, debt, and destruction until true restitution is made.

Much remains to be done by Cuba, particularly since the United States has already long ago initiated important steps to reflect its own atonement. Cuban pressure to repay for earlier inequities will not work. Only if both parties commit to a fair relationship, will we see commerce between the countries grow and bring benefits and economic growth.

Ambassador Jaeger and Christian Forstner at the First Year Seminar

As we are heading to the end of our Fall semester seminar, we have still three more guests to come and talk to students at the Georgetown McDonough School of Business. Yesterday, Nov. 15th, we had the pleasure to hear from two of these guests: Mr. Christian Forstner and Ambassador Kurt Jaeger.

Mr. Forstner is the Director of the Hanns Seidel Foundation’s Washington D.C. office, working with interested partners across the political spectrum to promote strong German-American ties. Part of his responsibilities is to facilitate high-level political dialog between German and American, covering topics such as international trade policy and transatlantic security and defense policy.


Mr. Forstner first started working at the Hanns Seidel Foundation in 2000, as Director at Moscow’s office. He also served the EU Commission as a Team Leader for the Technical Assistance to the Commonwealth of Independent States (TACIS) project.

Mr. Forstner has a master’s degree in Political Science, European History and Russian Literature from University of Munich and Moscow University of Foreign Languages, and developed several publications on EU affairs, security policy, and Russian and U.S. politics.

Ambassador Kurt Jaeger was appointed to the United States in August of 2016. He has over 25 years of experience in international regulatory affairs,

Mr. Jaeger was Ambassador of Liechtenstein to the European Union (EU) and Belgium from 2010 to 2016. Previously, he worked at the Swiss Federal Office for Civil Aviation for six years, being responsible for international air transport regulation and policy, and then became Executive Assistant to the Director General for Civil Aviation.

Before becoming Ambassador, Mr. Jaeger was also elected as one of three members of the Board of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) Surveillance Authority in charge of monitoring and enforcing the application of EU law in the European Economic Area (EEA) by the three EFTA-States Iceland, Liechtenstein, and Norway.

Ambassador Jaeger has a degree from the University of Fribourg, Switzerland, with a license en droit and with an LL.M. from McGill University, Montreal.

To know more about the First Year Seminar previous guests, please click here.