Birmingham Insights on Asia – (4) International Strategic Alliance Performance (High Technology Industry in Taiwan)

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This comment is based on Jo-Chun Chieh’s Dissertation written under the supervision of Prof. Michael Czinkota at the University of Birmingham, UK.

3, Organizational culture differences have more influence than national culture differences on International Strategic Alliance (ISA) performance, from the Taiwanese managers’ perspective. Two of the organizational cultural dimensions, professional and pragmatic orientation, ranked as the first two elements of importance when cooperating with a foreign partner, while two of the national cultural dimensions, uncertainty avoidance, long-term orientation, was ranked subsequently. Pothukuchi et al. (2002) addressed a similar concept with differences in organizational culture, compared to differences in national culture, considerably facilitating conflict and impeding cooperation between alliance partners.

4, The study justifies  that ISA practice indeed significantly interferes with the relationship between culture differences and iSA performance. John (1984) indicates that long and sticky partnership between cooperative enterprises reduces that potential for opportunistic behavior while the dissolution of a partnership often leads to poor decision-marketing, interaction and management of inter-organizational relationships. Complementary resources, absorptive capacity, commitment, and trust are important willingness to work together (Day & Klein, 1987). This partnership can evolve positive or negative consequences, depending on how Taiwanese managers implement their managerial practices with foreign partners.

 

Related Article: Birmingham Insights on Asia – (3) International Strategic Alliance Performance (High Technology Industry in Taiwan)

Birmingham Insights on Asia – (3) International Strategic Alliance Performance (High Technology Industry in Taiwan)

birmingham-clipart-256

This comment is based on Jo-Chun Chieh’s Dissertation written under the supervision of Prof. Michael Czinkota at the University of Birmingham, UK.

The study investigated the perspective of Taiwanese managers, thereby examining the impact of national and organizational culture differences and International Strategic Alliance (ISA) practices on ISA performance. Four findings can be concluded as follows.

1, National culture differences partly influence ISA performance, especially in the uncertainty avoidance and long-term orientation dimensions. This finding corresponds to one of the cultural functions proposed by Schneider (1989). He states that culture serves two functions, to solve external adaptation and internal integration problems. Uncertainty avoidance and long-term orientation especially impact on external adaptation. In other words, Taiwanese managers in the high-technology industry emphasize and are good t coping with opportunities and threats from the external environment, as well as being good at developing ISA strategies with foreign alliance partners. on the other hand, power distance, individualism and masculinity influence employee relationships within an organization.

2, Organizational culture differences also partly influence ISA performance, especially in professional and pragmatic (market -oriented) dimensions. Kasper (2001) associates corporate culture and market orientation, claiming that “market oriented organizations are open, employee-oriented, results-oriented, pragmatic, professional…”. This finding reflects that Taiwanese managers in the high-technology industry emphasize the importance of building objectives and obtaining new knowledge when cooperating with ISA foreign partners. Kasper (2001) also associates innovation, stating that customer contacts and customer participation in the R&D procedure are the basis of innovation. This notion implies that Taiwanese managers have high consciousness about global competition and pay attention on balancing innovation and market orientation.

Stay tuned for two more conclusions on our next Birmingham Insights on Asia.

The International Marketplace: Product Innovation May Come Mainly From China

           Since the 2007-2008 global recession, confidence in the American model of economic development has decreased significantly. Economists are eager to draw conclusions from China’s continued economic growth even though the economic slowdown that has affected much of the developed world. Many assert that Chinese economic policy is more stable because of the government’s large role. However, it may also be the demand of Chinese consumers which shapes innovation and supply.

            The American toilet company Kohler has just released the state-of-the-art Numi toilet. This toilet, designed and marketed primarily for the US and China, has many features included especially for the Chinese market. The toilet’s feet warming system is a solution to infamously cold Chinese bathrooms. Other Chinese market features include the Numi’s music system, Skype capabilities, and a bidet. This toilet suggests that even an American company must keep the Chinese populace in mind when developing products. In an editorial in the Financial Times, Christopher Caldwell concluded that the Numi toilet suggests more than just an increase in Chinese-centered goods. He claims that this toilet “is a sign that this era of US advantage is spiraling towards its close.” 

            Caldwell is not alone in his belief that Beijing will soon begin its reign of prominence. The Numi is not the only special global product marketed for China. In 2005 GM’s luxury sedan the Buick LaCrosse was redesigned especially for the Chinese market. Joe Qiu, designer of the Chinese version of the LaCrosse, told Fara Warner of Fast Company how he created a car that would sell well in the Chinese market. The interior of the car is meant to recreate the soft, luxurious environment of Chinese nightclubs and upscale Shanghai homes. The car’s exterior is sleek and trendy, targeting the chicest Chinese clientele. Since then, sales of the LaCrosse in China have outperformed those in the U.S. In 2010, GM released the updated version of the Buick LaCrosse globally. Much to US GM’s chagrin, the car’s interior was designed by Qiu. The US team was took point on the car’s interior, but had to take into account the input and edits from the Chinese design team. This move displayed how Chinese preferences trumped American ones. As a result, China gained more clout within the powerful American company GM. 

            With the second largest economy in the world and an envy-inducing continued growth, China is beginning to rival the United States’ position as the world’s economic leader. Whether the 21st century will become the age of China will be determined over time. Right now, Chinese preferences are beginning to share the lead in the development of new global products. 

Professor Michael R. Czinkota and Sophia Berhie

Sources: Caldwell, Christopher. “Telling Lessons for the Future from China’s Bathrooms.” Editorial, Financial Times (London), June 4, 2011; Waldmeir, Patti. “The Numi Toilet: Chinese Design for a Global Market.” Globe and Mail (Toronto), May 30, 2011. Accessed June 7, 2011. http://www.theglobeandmail.com/​report-on-business/​international-news/​ asian-pacific/​the-numi-toilet-chinese-design-for-a-global-market/​ article2040064/​; Warner, Fara. “Made in China.” Fast Company, April 1, 2007. Accessed June 7, 2011. http://www.fastcompany.com/​magazine/​114/​open_features-made-in-china.html.