Together for more and better

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Michael R. Czinkota

On a recent holiday, I had six teeth extracted. The insights I gathered during this process seemed relevant to current policy and election travails. My dentist’s office was closed, but he kindly came in to see me. Of course, his staff did not, since it was a holiday, but that did not worry me since I wanted my doctor’s skills, not those of his staff. After a lengthy procedure, my dentist gave me a pain prescription. Kind reader, please keep in mind – our local jurisdictions consist of the District of Columbia,  the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the State of Maryland. Each state has different pharmaceutical rules and laws, and political leadership. 

My dentist resides in Washington, D.C.; I live in Virginia but have to drive through Maryland to get home. My daughter kindly offered to pick me up from the appointment, and as my pain was growing, we stopped at a pharmacy to purchase the medication on the way home. But with little luck. “We don’t supply this medication,” we were told. Little matter, we drove to the next pharmacy a few miles away in Maryland, where my daughter trains to be an emergency medical technician. But since the prescription was in my name, and I am a Virginian, we again obtained no medication, but growing pain from my teeth.

Onwards then to Virginia. Yet here I was informed that the pain medication was a narcotic which in Virginia needed to be personally signed by the issuing doctor who, due to the holiday, had long ago left his office. Back to the car, with surging pain, we aimed for my home pharmacy where they know me. I always admonish my daughter to drive cautiously, but now I asked her to drive as fast as possible. It took 45 minutes, but finally, the home village came into sight.  About one kilometer before the town, we heard a horn behind us and saw a blue emergency light. It was a visiting state trooper who stopped us for driving at an excessive speed. I started to explain, but his gestures made me quickly recall the saying of ‘tell it to the judge’. Besides, I just wanted to get to the pharmacy.  

The trooper was quite meticulous, but 40 minutes later, we were on the road again. At the pharmacy,  we were immediately recognized and the prescription was, of course, filled right away. Apparently, word had gotten around regarding my earlier visits to other pharmacies since the pharmacist told me in confidence that ‘next time, just come here directly.’ The pills worked, and I thanked my daughter for her help, also promising to pay for all her expenses. In the end, the bills for speeding, lawyers, court cost, regular fees, speed measurement all added up to more than $ 1,300.

All this is truly not earth-shattering but of major impact nonetheless. Lack of collaboration may start out by discomforting life, but given time and repetition, can lead to growing social gaps.  America has, for more than one and a half centuries, principally drawn strength and a good life through success from its cohesiveness. Nevertheless, there have been shortcomings, apathies and neglect which require repair.

We must recognize and adjust our lives to cope with the growing complexity of the world today. Breaking up links and relationships is a bad idea. We continue to have an unsurpassed capacity for communication and analysis. We can find ways that allow for curative marketing or restitution for past or current wrongdoings. There clearly is room for improvement, be it for pain pills, jurisdiction, or treatment of people. Let’s take steps for the pursuit of happiness, which supports us all.– the Declaration of Independence has made a promise, but we as individuals need to deliver on it.

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Professor Michael Czinkota (czinkotm@georgetown.edu) is emeritus faculty of international marketing and trade at Georgetown University. His forthcoming book is International Business, 9th edition.

International Marketing and the Migrant-Owned Enterprise

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by Gary Knight, Michael Czinkota. Zaheer Khan

A hopefully interesting read! Please find the abstract of the published article along with the link to the full article below.

Abstract: We propose a research investigation on migrant-own businesses that undertake international marketing ventures. Migrant-owned firms contribute substantially to their adopted countries, and many launch international ventures, targeting their home countries and other international markets (Kerr and Kerr 2016; Light 2010; Saxenian 2002; OECD 2011; United Nations 2016; USAID 2009)

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/329225285_International_Marketing_and_the_Migrant-Owned_Enterprise_Research_Propositions_An_Abstract_Proceedings_of_the_2018_Academy_of_Marketing_Science_AMS_Annual_Conference

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Education: Key public and private investment choice for the coming administration

Prof.  Michael Czinkota

The next four years will determine where and how all the accumulated economic resources will be spent. The decisions will affect those suffering from rainy days to come. Targeted spending will sow seeds for innovation, technology, and the pursuit of happiness. In a post – Covid 19  era with large debts our environment needs to be poised for growth and expenditure. Education must become the core answer.

Covid 19 will continue to restructure the domestic and global economy, with one key facet being the delivery of education. Technology and information flows have redefined the entire field. For example, both students and teachers can again sit and wait for the common assignment to be handed out. We will increasingly need to take the path of self-direction, sharply differentiating between creativity, contentment, and the outlook of life for both students and faculty.

In addressing new issues in novel ways, we are not offering old wine in new containers but instead offering fundamental innovation and new methods of analysis combined with linkages between fields of thought. These methods need to enable students to overcome the gap when forced to communicate asynchronously. Within this context communication, planning and interaction attain new meaning. Online education needs to re-introduce specific dimensions of personal cross-fertilization. For example, we are not communicating and learning enough about the relationship between economically forced migration and entrepreneurship even though fundamental adjustments in education and capabilities could make the world of a difference to the lives of migrants.

There is a substantial need to re-define and newly address practical education and to do so simultaneously across functional fields with a concentrated focus at a low cost. I increasingly conclude that a re-fashioning of the educational goals, approaches, and delivery is needed. To make progress on my understanding,  I serve as a four-year board member on the Lord Fairfax Community College in Virginia representing the county of Page. Overall the college educates more than 23,000 students each year. Courses can cover the learning of a special and needed skill or to achieve academic progress that would lead to acceptance into a four-year college. Examples are students who engage in a career as phlebotomists, where they draw blood as a doctor’s assistant. Due to the exchange and transfer of academic credits, students also prepare with their studies for full graduation from a well-established but distant university which otherwise would be out of reach.

All this learning is done in a close-by facility which allows the student to save on housing costs, reduce psychological distance, and to maintain close ties with the family. This proximity helps in terms of personal as well as regional enrichment. Education brings clear advantages of brainpower and attracts further support just like tax rebates, logistics facilities, duty-free zones, or preferential market access.

Jenkins Hall of the LFCC will soon be inaugurated together with a new campus in Luray. Business subsidies are large and far-reaching. For decades I have traveled to historically unique edifices and structures.  I‘ve visited the Coliseum in Rome, the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, and burial sites in China and Egypt. When built, many were of them were capable of accommodating far more than the entire local population of their day. But there was a reason for such spatial exuberance. The new facilities including Jenkins hall reflect a desire to build a better future and a commitment to competitiveness.

The easy availability of money in today’s era and the alacrity to spend it in support of causes should make education both an example and exhortation. Both Georgetown University and LFCC have a unique opportunity during this period of Covid-19, to adjust and finetune their offering and education model. There are many ways to improve our capabilities in terms of design, delivery, and diversity. There is much we can learn from each other. Let us leave future generations to ponder and admire the strength and enthusiasm supporting our education.

Prof. Czinkota (czinkotm@georgetown.edu) is on the faculty emeritus of the Georgetown University Business School and serves on the board of Lord Fairfax Community College Board. He served in the US government as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce. His key book is International Marketing, 11th ed. Cengage 2021