There is Nothing Wrong With Civility

There is a new, more dramatic form of hostility in the media and their users. I knew that but only now have experienced it with an anvil falling on me. I wrote an article for The Hill which distributes news in and around the US Capitol, entitled, “Thanks to Trump, America Shows True Leadership on the World Stage,” and the article triggered over 550 comments.

To my dismay, the article did not garner thought-provoking debate, but rather a disparage of uninformed commentary. Many writers had appeared to not even have read the article. Commentators argued primarily about the fact that Trump is not a leader, that they do not like him or his cabinet appointments, and disagree with his international performance. An overwhelming 575 out of the 582 of the comments were negative, while only three commentators made direct reference to the author and the article itself.

Commentators did not even address the arguments made in the article. Rather they used my thoughts as a platform for entirely extraneous arguments. There were continuously scrolling pages of hateful comments and threats aimed as a reply to specific earlier comments made. Users called each other names and created a fiercely hostile environment against freedom of speech.

There was no “conversation” or “discourse” or even arguments among people on the subject. It appears to me that neither readers nor writers learned new aspects due to the comments from the blog. They also clearly appeared not to be looking for such edification.

When making comments, readers should do themselves, their friends (and even their antagonists) a favor. Next time one encounters an article with a disagreeable title or first sentence, it should be read, thought about, and then commented on. Education and learning is the best form of artillery in an argument

Thank you, Mr. President

AP-donald-trump-g7-jt-170528_12x5_1600-2Here we go again: The U.S president is attacked on a global scale for his thinking on trade and investments. Mrs. Merkel, chancellor of Germany even announced a “new chapter in U.S. European relations” and stated that “Europe must take our fate into our own hands’’. Similar accusations had been raised in 1980 after the election of President Reagan. He was labelled a B class actor, a cowboy and an inexperienced but lucky vote gainer. The accusers were wrong then and they are wrong now!

President Trump lived up to his convictions during the tense G-7 political summit just as he had already done during and after the U.S. presidential campaign. No surprises there when he reflected on the need for more balanced trade relations and the requirement for all nations to pay a fair contribution for the benefits they obtained from the United States.

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New World, New Policy: Buy American, Hire American

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President Trump has issued a new executive order focusing on so-called “Buy American, Hire American” policies. Making the announcement at the Snap-On Tools plant in Kenosha, Wisconsin, the President’s order directs various federal agencies to produce reports and recommendations on government procurement policies, with the goal of increasing domestic employment and production.

The Executive Order (found here) covers two broad areas of government policy: numerous “Buy American” laws and regulations, which set requirements that materials purchased by the government – say, steel for building a bridge – give preference to US domestic producers; and “Hire American,” which aim to address reported abuses of H1B visas that undermine high-skilled domestic labor.

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