On Freedom and International Marketing, Part 7: Joint Occurrence

This is one of the published series on the linkages between freedom and international marketing.

How do freedom and international marketing match with today’s discontent so forcefully expressed by the disgruntlement of the anti-globalists? Many claim that never before in history has there been so much evidence about such strong opposition to globalization and to Americans as harbingers of international marketing.

Perhaps those making such claims are sadly mistaken. In looking at other ‘‘globalizers’’ in world history, such as the Vikings, the Mongols, the Tatars, and the Romans, there probably was both intellectual and physical opposition (or do we really believe that everybody enjoyed Genghis Khan?). But protest was never allowed to become very vocal, or to engage in repeated, large demonstrations or widespread pamphleteering. Due to rather harsh policies of dealing with the opposition, very few records of such resistance are available today. Consequently, comparisons with past events are difficult to make and are likely to be highly inaccurate.

Today’s news is good. The nations, institutions and individuals around the world are increasingly accepting freedom as the key foundation of the good life. We are discovering that international marketing, both as a discipline and as an activity is very closely interwoven with freedom—some even call it essential. It is the freedom Thomas Aquinas saw as the means to human excellence and happiness which international marketing helps us reach. In reciprocal causality, freedom causes and facilitates international marketing, while international marketing is a key support of the cause of freedom. A productive symbiosis at work!

Historic Trade Deal with Europe Moves Forward, Despite US Snooping

The US –EU transatlantic trade deal, will go to a second round of talks in mid- November, but could hit a stumbling block over Germany’s demand for data protection as a condition to signing the treaty.

The EU and US policymakers agreed to hold two more rounds of trade negotiations over the next two months, The Wall Street Journal reports. The first round will take place in Brussels on November 11-15 and cover investment and energy sector trade, as well as address regulatory issues. In December officials will congregate in Washington DC for another round of talks.

After learning about the NSA special surveillance program on more than 80 embassies and consulates worldwide, including German government offices and Chancellor Angela Merkel’s personal cell phone, Germany has pushed for tough data protection goals before the free trade pact is finalized.

US still hasn’t provided any guarantees it will curb spying on its allies.

First talks were held on July 8 in Washington DC.

Originally the second round of talks were scheduled for October 7-11 in Brussels, but were delayed due to the US government shutdown.

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), which has the potential to boost economic growth by $100 billion per year in reduced tariffs, was agreed on at  the G8 summit in  Northern Ireland in June.

Shortly after, NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden leaked information showing the extent of USespionage on allies abroad. In response, France and other EU members said there could be no trade negotiation unless the US could guarantee it would halt spying operation on EU allies.

The “once in a generation prize” could add as much as about $157 billion to the EU economy, over $125 billion to the US economy and as much as around US$ 133 billion to the rest of the world, UK Prime Minister David Cameron said at the G8 summit. Over 98 percent of EU tariffs would be eliminated under the accord.

President Obama said the ‘economic NATO’, which would be the world’s largest trade agreement, is a priority for his administration and will hopefully be signed by the end of 2013.

EU diplomats traveled to Washington to discuss the NSA spy fallout, but weren’t satisfied with the answers they received, which failed to justify the eavesdropping on EU leaders by the US.

The trade deal could be a vital economic turnaround for the 28 EU members, which are just starting to emerge from recession. In 2012, the EU’s economy was $17 trillion, according to Eurostat.

In the aftermath of extending bilateral trade ties, the deal is due to cover about 50 percent of global economic output, 30 percent of global trade and 20 percent of global foreign direct investment.

On November 1, Germany and Brazil submitted a new draft resolution to the UN General Assembly which calls for an end to excessive electronic surveillance, data collection, and other snooping techniques.

source: rt.com

image: Reuters / Tobias Schwarz

Top Ten Countries with which the U.S. Trades

For the month of April 2013

                                                  Year To Date
                                    Total in         Total in
                                    Billions         Billions
 Country Name                       of U.S. $        of U.S. $

 Canada                                         54.75           208.98
 Mexico                                         44.24           164.53
 China                                           42.09           167.43
 Japan                                                  17.04            67.11
 Germany                                       13.62            51.55
 Korea, South                                  8.79            34.23
 United Kingdom                              7.81            32.58
 France                                          6.75            24.20
 Switzerland                                   6.32            19.55
 India                                            5.73            20.56

source: http://www.census.gov/foreign-trade/top/dst/current/balance.html

Weekly Update: Top 5 International Business News Trends

1. U.S. deficit falls to $680 billion. The federal government’s latest annual deficit is the smallest it’s been since 2008, according to Treasury Department data released Wednesday. http://money.cnn.com/2013/10/30/news/economy/deficit-2013-treasury/index.html

2. Islamic world slipping behind economically, Pakistan PM warns. Economic and intellectual stagnation has left Islamic nations incapable of punching their weight in the wider world, the prime minister of Pakistan has warned. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/pakistan/10411814/Islamic-world-slipping-behind-economically-Pakistan-PM-warns.html

3. Is Puerto Rico the next Detroit? Puerto Rico has been called the next Detroit and the next Greece. It’s buried in debt and possibly teetering on the edge of bankruptcy. http://money.cnn.com/2013/10/31/investing/puerto-rico-hedge-funds/index.html

4. US criticizes Germany and China policies.The US has criticized Germany’s economic policies, saying that its export-led growth model is hurting the eurozone and the wider global economy. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-24753267

5. Russia to invest $1.5 bn into new domestic energy projects in Ecuador, making the South American country a key partner in the region, President Vladimir Putin said at a meeting with Ecuadorian President Rafael Correa in Moscow. http://rt.com/business/russia-invest-ecuador%20energy-956/