Mr. J. Michael Farrell Concluding the First Year Seminar

At the end of the Fall semester seminar, we had the great pleasure of welcoming Mr. J. Michael Farrell.

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Mr. J. Michael Farrell is the principal of the Law Offices of J. Michael Farrell. He specializes in international arbitration proceedings before the International Court of Arbitration as operated by the International Chamber of Commerce, the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law and the American Arbitration Association. Mr. Farrell was a member of the National Commission on Libraries and Information Science. In 1992, he was designated by the President as Chairman of the Commission. In 1992, the President appointed Mr. Farrell as Commissioner of the United States of America on the Commission for the Study of Alternatives to the Panama Canal. The Commission was composed of representatives from the Governments of Japan, Panama and the United States. In 1993, he became Chairman of the Commission. From February 1988 through August 1991, Mr. Farrell was a Deputy Commissioner on the Commission, having been appointed by President Reagan. He was appointed by the Secretary of Energy as a member of the National Petroleum Council. He is a Director of the US-Panama Business Council, Institute for the Study of Diplomacy (Georgetown University) and the Air Force Academy Foundation. He also served as Deputy Head of the office of Presidential Personnel. 

Mr. Farrell presented his views about sanctions and international business. He offered some of his high level experiences and engaged the students in a conversation about their aspirations and career paths.

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By the end of the class, Prof. Czinkota gave out certificates to the students for their excellence and engagement in the class.

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For the rest of the pictures of the student, please click here.

To know more about the First Year Seminar’s content and previous guests, please click here.

Breakfast of Champions


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Breakfast

On Monday (11th December, 2017) morning we hosted a get together for selected post graduate students.  These were drawn from course reps but also selected by Program Directors who identified individuals whose contribution to the programs was really making a difference.   Students were asked to offer brief feedback on…

– I feel good, because….

– I’d love to do more of….

– my best class experience was…

– on Campus, I enjoy most…

– millennials need classes to focus on ….

– …. will help me most with a job

Things students said in their two minute talk included:

  • I feel good being part of an academic community.
  • Each day, I improve.
  • Kent offers an entrepreneurial course, designed around asking professionals in the finance industry. As such, not only do I get academic skills but I’m gaining professional skills too.
  • I value the Bloomberg Room.
  • Professors are all very helpful and I’m learning relevant skills
  • Being on the program gives me different cultural perspectives.
  • I have found seminars really help me in developing my skills – it’s great to talk with so many different nationalities.

Thanks to Michael for his idea, for organizing the medals and for being thoroughly affable. Thanks to Tamsin for helping with arrangements.  Thanks also to Martin, Radu, Jaideep, Shaomin, Omar, Irena and Maddy for coming along.

Merry Christmas

Christmas is just around the corner. Hope everyone enjoys the music piece presented by Regensburger Domspatzen – In commemoration of the director of the Regensburger Domspatzen Franz Xaver Magerl, grandfather of professor Czinkota.

 

 

Sometimes even rankings can be Christmas presents

GoogleRankingCongratulations to Professor Dr. Michael R. Czinkota on being recognized as one of the world’s leading authors on international business and marketing for publications during the period 1980-2015! Throughout the 35 years, Professor Czinkota has always stayed in the top 20 of the prolific authors list from different sources.

“An analysis of significant contributions to the international business literature” in the Journal of International Business Studies rated Professor Czinkota among the top 3 most prolific authors worldwide, 1980-1989.

An analysis in the Asian Pacific Journal of Management ranked Professor Czinkota as #4 in the Journal of World Business, #7 in the Journal of International Marketing and #14 in all 6 leading business journals in the world for the time period 1996-2006.

More recently, Professor Czinkota was recognized among the top 8 pioneering researchers in international marketing around the world. He was also ranked among the top 20 most prolific international marketing authors during the period 1995-2015 in an anthology by Leonidou, Katsikeas, Samiee and Aykol. (2018)

In December 2017 – right before Christmas, Professor Czinkota occupied the first place of Global Google citations for export promotion and export management. He also ranked in second place for trade policy and place 8 for International Marketing, which is an exciting present for Christmas.

Professor Czinkota teaches at the McDonough School of Business of Georgetown University and at the Kent Business School, University of Kent. He was awarded the Significant Contribution to Global Marketing award by the American Marketing Association in 2007. Professor Czinkota is the co-author of International Marketing, 10th Edition, Cengage (with I. Ronkainen); International Business, 8th Edition, Wiley (with I. Ronkainen and M. Moffett) and Fundamentals of International Business, 6th Edition, (with I. Ronkainen and M. Moffett), Wessex. His blog also was named the third most successful international business blog.

Religions, Christmas, and International Marketing


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Historically, the religious tradition in the United States, based on Christianity and Judaism, has emphasized hard work, thrift, and a simple lifestyle. These religious values have certainly evolved over time; many of our modern marketing activities would not exist if these older values had persisted. Thrift, for instance, presumes that a person will save hard-earned wages and use these savings for purchases later on. Today, Americans take full advantage of the ample credit facilities that are available to them. The credit card is such a vital part of the American lifestyle that saving before buying seems archaic. Most Americans feel no guilt in driving a big SUV or generously heating a large house.

Christmas is one Christian tradition that remains an important event for many consumer goods industries in all Christian countries. Retailers have their largest sales around that time. However, Christmas is a good illustration of the substantial differences that still exist among even predominantly Christian societies. A large U.S.-based retailer of consumer electronics discovered these differences the hard way when it opened its first retail outlet in the Netherlands. The company planned the opening to coincide with the start of the Christmas selling season and bought advertising space accordingly for late November and December, as retailers do in the United States. The results proved less than satisfactory. Major gift giving in Holland takes place, not around December 25, Christmas Day, but on St. Nicholas Day, December 6. Therefore, the opening of the company’s retail operation was late and missed the major buying season.

From a marketing point of view, Christmas has increasingly become a global phenomenon. For many young Chinese, Christmas is not regarded as a religious holiday but simply represents “fun.” Fashionable bars charge up to $25 for entrance on Christmas Eve, and hotel restaurants charge $180 for a Christmas Eve function. The week around Christmas is the top grossing week for movie theaters in China, as young Chinese head out to theaters together instead of watching pirated DVDs at home. Santa Claus is increasing in popularity in the predominantly Sunni Muslim country of Turkey. In Istanbul shopping centers, children stand in line to sit on Santa’s lap and ask for gifts. Stores sell Santa suits and statues.

With billions of people celebrating Christmas and exchanging wishes of peace, perhaps we will see at least some of the inspired and faithful take personal steps which reduce the barbarities which humanity commits against itself in the many ongoing wars. Also, a time of remembrance of the difficult travels of Joseph and Mary, with Jesus soon to be born, might help us soften our stance against refugees and migrants in the world. Remember, we all – but for the mercy of God- could be the ones looking for succor and support.

Here is a holiday greeting from Prof. Czinkota and Prof. Skuba.

Merry Christmas!